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The Future of satellite Internet

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Sophomore

The Future of satellite Internet

I'm just wondering if Hughes is planning shooting up new satellites in the next few months? I know there are news about 2021 or something like that, but I don't think that it's good enough.

 

So far, there are 4! corporations working hard on building new Satellite Internet system, with literally tens of thousands of new satellites, all over the United States, low orbit, low latency, crazy fast speed, no data cap, etc. We are talking about Billions of dollars, huge projects. The government gave green light for 1 corporation already.

 

So the question is, if Hughes going to run and start the system uprading immediately? Getting in business would force today's 3 Large existing satellite Internet providers upgrading, shoot up new low orbit satellites, wiping off data caps, or at least raising it to a Terrabyte or something, working on latencies, the ping is 650 or so at this point, 1 new company promises around 50, and that would be low enough to play online games. 650 is no way for any FPS or similar games. Also, if the 3 large satellite providers wants to stay in business, they - beside upgrading the the speed and removing data cap - has to lower the prices too. There is no exact prices for the new projects, but people are guessing under $50.

 

So far, I'm ok with Hughes. Not much better than Dish was, but the customer service is more nice and they gave US a deal too.

 

I didn't find any news about it, but I hope Hughes can upgrade their system really soon, working on a solution to stay in business, shooting up a few more satellites in a very close futre, removing data cap, lowering ping, lowering the monthly fee and customers can get fast and relliable capless Internet, and gladly pay for the service. :-) 

6 REPLIES 6
Distinguished Professor III

Re: The Future of satellite Internet

@stevef 

 

The earliest HughesNet will be sending up a new satellite is 2021, like you heard.  Satellite design, launch and placement take a lot of planning and work.  The design and planning for the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) satellite systems you're reading about have been in the planning stages for at least a few years.  As well, LEO and GEO systems are very different.

 

Chances are, general LEO internet offerings are still at least a couple of years out.


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Assistant Professor

Re: The Future of satellite Internet

Hughes is an investor/partner with OneWeb. The more I read about the LEO systems projected for the near future the less I think they are going to serve many residential customers especially in the US. It seems they are targeting third world locations and things like schools, hospitals, business, etc. at first, so most likely will still be several years before US residential customers will see it offered, if at all.

 

Also, launching large, heavy geosynchronous satellites that cover the majority the US is much different technically and cost wise than small LEO satellites.

Sophomore

Re: The Future of satellite Internet

I don't know, but all the corporations have money, at least 1 got government approval, and they have to do it, as the government gave them exact date-lines. They really have to start it soon, as news says in 2020, the satellite system could be operational.

 

I guess the planning takes long, as all of them have to get approved by the government. But as the government also working together with these corporations and profiting by their projects, I wouldn't be surprised if the projects would really speed up in the next 10 months.

 

We can say, logically thinking, If even 1 of the 4 projects would become reality soon (in the next year or 2), it would put the old satellite providers in a really difficult spot. 

Sophomore

Re: The Future of satellite Internet

True, on the other hand OneWeb plans to shoot up less than 700 satellites, the other company plans 7,000. The 3rd one 2,200 or so. I think the 4th one is still just thinking of starting a project, but maybe the competition scares them away, who knows. :-) 

Distinguished Professor III

Re: The Future of satellite Internet


@BirdDog wrote:

Hughes is an investor/partner with OneWeb.  


I remembered that they were doing something with the ground stations for one of them, but I couldn't remember which.  It's good that they're involved.


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit

Re: The Future of satellite Internet

 One hopes that things will get better for those of us who are stuck with satellite internet, and I think it will get somewhat better in the future.   Not a whole lot, because the same people that own many of the satellite ISPS also have big investments in TV also.  For example AT&T just bought DirecTV.  I doubt they are going to let their ISP business destroy their money making TV business, by making it easy for customers to stream live TV with no data limits.  IOW pay me for TV or pay me for more internet data. 

 

  There's more about this at this link:

 

https://www.cio.com/article/3075975/what-big-isps-dont-want-you-to-know-about-data-caps.html