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Gen5 cheaper modem?

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Senior

Gen5 cheaper modem?

Will a cheaper modem without WiFi be offered?

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Associate Professor

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?

It's mostly wifi tools like Wifi Analyzer on Android devices I use.  Don't have any laptops or anything that I can really put stuff on at the moment.

How does nmap determine who makes what? Surely it's just going based upon MAC addressing?

Here is what I can find from the F.C.C. filings...

Qualcomm QCA9882-BR4A - AC Wifi
Qualcomm QCA8337-AL3C - 7 port switch
Qualcomm QCA9563-AL3A - BGN Wifi

Looks like they used some off the shelf components, but they don't appear to be too cheap.

The AC controller alone, if Hughes ordered 150,000 units of it would be about $8.50 per chip, that's just the chip.  That's not counting any of the supporting components, nor engineering that was required to interface that chip with the SoC and Switch that was used.

All in all, each of these units do cost a good bit more than the old units.

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9 REPLIES 9
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Associate Professor

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?

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Senior

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?


@C0RR0SIVE wrote:

Not for Jupiter II, though they may later on offer the HT1100 modem on Jupiter One with Gen5 plans, but I suspect that is unlikely.


Well that's the pits. Force the expensive modem with no other choice. Just like Directv making you take whatever they have on the truck regardless of the fact that it isn't the one you ordered.

 

Thanks for the response, Corrosive

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Associate Professor

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?

Not much we can really do about it since the modem has to handle all sorts of things dealing with satellite communications and the only Jupiter II compatible one happens to be the more expensive one.

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Senior

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?


@C0RR0SIVE wrote:

Not much we can really do about it since the modem has to handle all sorts of things dealing with satellite communications and the only Jupiter II compatible one happens to be the more expensive one.

 

Seems that WiFi increases the price, right? If so, they could at least offer a Jupiter II modem without it. My router was pretty expensive, that is why I'm thinking that is what is making the Jupiter II one so expensive.

 

Just venting. Thanks Corrosive.


 

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Sophomore

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?

The hardware involved in adding WiFi to a product these days is only a couple of dollars in the volumes HN would buy. For comparison hobbyists can buy WiFi modules for $7 for 1 piece. https://www.sparkfun.com/products/13678

 

So I wouldn't expect a non-WiFi modem to be much cheaper than the WiFi counterpart.

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Associate Professor

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?

From the looks of things, it's actually going to be more expensive than you think... Looks like Hughes contracted a company (going by F.C.C. documents here...) to design the wireless radios, antennas, and other components of the router side of the modem.  Which means that some serious money was dumped into R&D on just a few aspects of it...  

Sorry, but Hughes isn't using off the shelf components in this.

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Associate Professor
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Associate Professor

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?

Hrm, various software packages I use report the MAC associated with my wifi radios is Hughesnet...  It's possible nmap hasn't updated the list of MAC addresses and who owns them.

Highlighted
Associate Professor

Re: Gen5 cheaper modem?

It's mostly wifi tools like Wifi Analyzer on Android devices I use.  Don't have any laptops or anything that I can really put stuff on at the moment.

How does nmap determine who makes what? Surely it's just going based upon MAC addressing?

Here is what I can find from the F.C.C. filings...

Qualcomm QCA9882-BR4A - AC Wifi
Qualcomm QCA8337-AL3C - 7 port switch
Qualcomm QCA9563-AL3A - BGN Wifi

Looks like they used some off the shelf components, but they don't appear to be too cheap.

The AC controller alone, if Hughes ordered 150,000 units of it would be about $8.50 per chip, that's just the chip.  That's not counting any of the supporting components, nor engineering that was required to interface that chip with the SoC and Switch that was used.

All in all, each of these units do cost a good bit more than the old units.

View solution in original post