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Best way to test latency?

Distinguished Professor I

Re: Best way to test latency?

Check my previous post. Smiley Happy

Freshman

Re: Best way to test latency?

Screenshot 2020-01-03 at 4.49.38 PM.pngScreenshot 2020-01-03 at 4.47.11 PM.png

Finally realized I needed to use the insertion tool here instead of copy/pasting! What a dingdong I am, trying to focus on too many things at once. So here's those tracepath results. One for Netflix and one for Google.

Distinguished Professor I

Re: Best way to test latency?

Are those the whole screenshots? They both look cut off at the bottom.  

Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Best way to test latency?

@zenman 

 

I think a firewall or something else may be blocking access for the tracepath.  Something's not right, as most of those "no reply" lines should instead be filled with IP addresses and latency results.  

 

Do you have a separate firewall device or firewall program that you're using?  If so, it would be a good idea to disable it while running the tracepath, as it appears that something is blocking its ability to test anything outside of your own network. 

 

I'm not at all familiar with Chromebooks, nor their OS, so I have no idea what else to try.  Smiley Sad


AMD Ryzen 5 3400G | XPG SX8200 Pro 500GB M.2 NVMe SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB Corsair DDR4-3000 | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Distinguished Professor I

Re: Best way to test latency?

I wonder if the "no reply" is similar to the *** of the Windows traceroute.  I'd test this but my Chromebook is many miles away and I won't see it until 1/13.

 

EDIT:

 

See, like this:

 

1: 192.168.0.14 0.131ms pmtu 1500
1: no reply
2: dynamic-76-73-172-97.knology.net 119.110ms
3: 76-73-168-104.knology.net 97.118ms
4: xe-9-3-0.bar1.Cleveland1.Level3.net 102.568ms asymm 5
5: no reply
6: no reply
7: ae-104-3504.edge1.Washington12.Level3.net 135.317ms
8: att-level3-te.washingtondc12.Level3.net 102.696ms
9: cr1.wswdc.ip.att.net 101.485ms asymm 20
10: cr2.rlgnc.ip.att.net 102.262ms asymm 19
11: cr1.rlgnc.ip.att.net 193.578ms asymm 18
12: cr82.chlnc.ip.att.net 102.323ms asymm 17
13: 12.123.138.157 178.434ms asymm 16
14: 12.125.220.30 107.549ms asymm 17

 

 

 


@GabeU wrote:

 

I think a firewall or something else may be blocking access for the tracepath.  Something's not right, as most of those "no reply" lines should instead be filled with IP addresses and latency results.  

 

Do you have a separate firewall device or firewall program that you're using?  If so, it would be a good idea to disable it while running the tracepath, as it appears that something is blocking its ability to test anything outside of your own network. 

 

I'm not at all familiar with Chromebooks, nor their OS, so I have no idea what else to try.  Smiley Sad


 

Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Best way to test latency?


@maratsade wrote:

I wonder if the "no reply" is similar to the *** of the Windows traceroute.   


It may be, but the fact that there are no results from anything outside of the network suggests that something is blocking those hops from being tested.


AMD Ryzen 5 3400G | XPG SX8200 Pro 500GB M.2 NVMe SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB Corsair DDR4-3000 | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Distinguished Professor I

Re: Best way to test latency?

This is why I asked to see the whole screenshot -- maybe it picks up again after the many "no reply" hops, like it happens sometime with Windows tracert.  Anyway, your idea's good.   (I would also restart the modem)

 


@GabeU wrote:

 

It may be, but the fact that there are no results from anything outside of the network suggests that something is blocking those hops from being tested.


 

Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Best way to test latency?


@maratsade wrote:

(I would also restart the modem) 


Good idea.  

 

@zenman 

 

Like maratsade just suggested, it would be a good idea to restart the modem just in case there is anything "stuck" with it.  To do so, it would first be best to shut down your Chromebook, then unplug the HughesNet modem at either the wall outlet or the power pack.  Then, after waiting for at least 30 seconds, plug the modem back in.  Then, after waiting for at least five minutes in order to ensure that the modem is fully ready, start your Chromebook and give the tracepath a try again to see if your results are any different. 


AMD Ryzen 5 3400G | XPG SX8200 Pro 500GB M.2 NVMe SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB Corsair DDR4-3000 | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Assistant Professor

Re: Best way to test latency?

tracepath is weird. No idea what it's doing.

traceroute is what you should be using. If Chromebooks run on Android, which I think they do, I think you have to su to root run traceroute first. I just ran it in Terminal Emulator:

Screen Shot 2020-01-03 at 8.20.40 PM.jpg


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Best way to test latency?

@MarkJFine 

 

They run on Chrome OS.  It's a type of Linux, I believe.  


AMD Ryzen 5 3400G | XPG SX8200 Pro 500GB M.2 NVMe SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB Corsair DDR4-3000 | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit