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Best way to test latency?

Assistant Professor

Re: Best way to test latency?

So's Android.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Distinguished Professor I

Re: Best way to test latency?

I don't believe you can run a traceroute on a Chromebook.  Their command interface runs a tracepath, but if you type traceroute or tracert, you get nothing, or you get an error (I haven't my Chromebook here to test).  Chromebooks run on Chrome OS (Linux kernel-based).

 

 

 

MarkJFine wrote:

tracepath is weird. No idea what it's doing.

traceroute is what you should be using. If Chromebooks run on Android, which I think they do, I think you have to su to root run traceroute first. I just ran it in Terminal Emulator:

 


 

Freshman

Re: Best way to test latency?

I'm back. I didn't send the whole screen because it was just like 30 lines of no reply that ended with:

Too many hops: pmtu 1500

Resume: pmtu 1500

-- and then a new command line, so I screenshot what I thought was the relevant part at the top. Tracepath seems to be the correct command. Like everything else on a chromebook, the terminal is also via the browser, maybe that's why the difference. I have ublock and https everywhere on the browser, but turned them off. I have installed nothing extra in the way of firewalls on my chromebook or its browser (other than the things I mentioned, which were turned off) or on the Hughes HT2000W wifi router. The router is connected via cable to the Hughes dish outside, and that's all folks.

 

I shut down the chromebook and router and let them cool. I hooked into the router via ethernet cord and ran the test again, and was running on the chromebook's battery -- not plugged into a power source. Same results.

Screenshot 2020-01-03 at 4.47.11 PM.png

 

 

Assistant Professor

Re: Best way to test latency?

I tried tracepath on Android and got the same thing - couldn't get past the gateway to the internet, and multiple lines for the same hop. Anything past that was no reply, just like your's. There were some command switches that could be changed but I didn't bother with them too much. Chances are there's something to open up the wait period because the default timeout is likely too small.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Distinguished Professor I

Re: Best way to test latency?

Good you were able to test it.  

 

I wonder if there's a bug that needs to be reported to Google (they might fix it within the next 50 years or so). 

 

https://bugs.chromium.org/p/chromium/issues/list

Assistant Professor

Re: Best way to test latency?

I thought there might be some underlying commonality, but apparently I was wrong:
https://www.difference.wiki/android-os-vs-chrome-os/

ChromeOS is basically a browser and a hard disk for local temp space with everything else in the cloud... lol - not what you really want on this network.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Distinguished Professor I

Re: Best way to test latency?

That's right. It works just fine on HN, though, and there are some things you can have offline (like Google Drive and some apps).   

Assistant Professor

Re: Best way to test latency?

I've used Google apps. They do work ok, but the data usage is... ugh.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Distinguished Professor I

Re: Best way to test latency?

I normally use my Chromebook at work, but I've brought it home and found no increase in data usage.   EDIT:  It doesn't work like a phone at all. I think apps on phones can eat data if the settings aren't changed, but it doesn't work this way on the Chromebook.  You're basically on the Chrome browser.  No wifi, no data usage.  Apps that need syncing (Docs, Wunderlist) will sync once back online, but the data usage is the same as you would've used if you were using the app on the wifi. 

Assistant Professor

Re: Best way to test latency?

Understand. And that's true if what you're working on was locally held when you last turned it off, then trurned it on without wifi access. Supposed you'd have to be careful about turning the wifi back on to retrieve your work from the cloud, then turn it off again once you had it, then synched it back later. I'm more concerned about the constant thrashing it does if you don't turn the wifi off.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.