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FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Tutor

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Whoa, I hope Spaceway doesn't fall on my house when it croaks off. I wonder if I should put up the shields?
Professor

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Waiting for the replies.......wrong......wrong.....all lies. Lol.
Followed by a report to the BBB.
Professor

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

GW, ready countermeasures.
Honorary Alumnus

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Maybe not:


"For geostationary satellites, it requires a big burst of fuel to deorbit and crash back to Earth, roughly 1,500 meters per second. In contrast, boosting that same satellite up to the graveyard orbit only takes a change of velocity of 11 meters per second. Alas, a satellite needs to do more than go fast to make it to the satellite graveyard — changing orbits also requires functional attitude controls, which not every aging satellite can pull off with grace.

By now, it's standard practice to retire old satellites in stable storage orbits 300 kilometers above the functional high geosynchronous orbits. It's a retirement home for elderly spacecraft, where they can admire the view and shuffle around peacefully without constantly having young whippersnapper satellites dodging around them. Best of all, it has a nice, healthy buffer between it and the functional satellites, so even if a retired satellite gets a bit wonky in its orbit, it won't go staggering into active traffic without warning.

At the moment we have over a hundred satellites in the graveyard orbit. For now, it's working. But eventually, with more satellites retiring upwards and onwards, sooner or later we're going to get collisions in the graveyard orbit. A high-orbit collision would produce space junk with a long residency time, endangering active satellites."


http://gizmodo.com/where-do-satellites-go-to-die-1572821932



Professor

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Star Trek makes it look so much easier.
Honorary Alumnus

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Capt. Kirk could never fit in the turbo-lift these days Smiley Happy


Assistant Professor

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Advanced Tutor

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Hey, watch it! This is a family friendly forum. There shall be no insults to Capt. Kirk here! ;-)
Professor

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Capt. Kirk remains powerful and well connected across the sector, all from his BarcaLounger at the Starfleet Retirement Home, I'll have you know.  He doesn't need no turbolifts.
Moderator
Moderator

Re: FCC Broadband Report Ranks HughesNet #1 in Meeting Advertised Performance

Thanks for sharing this, Alan!

-Liz

Thanks,
Liz

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