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FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

New Member

FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

What do you think will come of this? 

Do you think if passed it will help Satellite customers, or will it hurt the internet all together?


"FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

The Federal Communications Commission is driving toward a landmark vote Thursday on a sweeping plan that critics warn would impose a new era of regulation for how Americans use and do business on the Internet, even as 11th-hour appeals inject added drama behind the scenes.

At issue is a proposal that proponents say would ensure an "open" Internet, by growing the government's power to oversee Internet service providers and establish new rules to bar companies from blocking or slowing data.

While Wheeler (Chairman) and consumer groups say the proposal is necessary to prevent providers from creating slow or fast Internet lanes in which content companies like Netflix can pay to jump to the head of the queue, Pai co-authored a Politico op-ed with Federal Election Commission member Lee Goodman describing the plan as "heavy-handed."
They said it would allow the FCC to regulate broadband rates; "decree" whether companies can offer "consumer-friendly service plans" like unlimited access to streaming music; and claim the power to force companies to "physically deploy broadband infrastructure."

The commissioners argued that the panel was conjuring the idea of "digital dysfunction" in order to "justify a public-sector power grab."  Wheeler, though, has pushed back on the calls for a delay.
Even if the FCC approves the plan on Thursday, the next stop may be the courts. Industry lobbyists say it's likely that one of the major providers will sue and ask the court to suspend enforcement pending appeal."

Source Fox News Website 
26 REPLIES 26
Honorary Alumnus

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

And loopholes being created.


New Member

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

I think there needs to be more information made available that has thus far remained hidden. How can we determine whether it's bad or good for us all if we are not fully informed. Politicians (Republicans) are asking for 30 days for the public to review the proposal. That is as it should be for ALL legistation...look what happened when ObamaCare was "passed". No one read it, so no one except the deceptive designers knew what the heck it would all mean. Like Pelosi said..."we have to pass it before we know what's in it". How dumb is that? Same goes for this law that effects us all. WE need to know what it involves.
Here is the latest news about that.
Commissioners urge delay in FCC plan to regulate ‘every nut and bolt’ of Internet Published February 24, 2015FoxNews.com


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wheeler_pai_032714jpg

In this March 27, 2014 photo, Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler, left, and FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai arrive to testify before a Senate subcommittee in Washington, D.C. (Reuters)



The two Republican members of the Federal Communications Commission are urging the Democratic chairman to delay a high-drama vote on a secret Internet regulation plan, with one warning the proposal would "impose rules upon almost every nut and bolt" of how Americans use the Internet. 

The so-called net neutrality plan, which has not been made public, is scheduled for an FCC vote on Thursday. 

After warning about the implications of the proposal for weeks, Republican Commissioners Ajit Pai and Mike O'Rielly made a last-minute, two-pronged appeal to the chairman on Monday: "immediately release" the 332-plan, and delay the vote for at least 30 days so the public can review it. 

"With the future of the entire Internet at stake, it is imperative that the FCC get this right," they said in a joint statement. "And to do that, we must live up to the highest standards of transparency." 

Chairman Tom Wheeler and others have previewed select parts of the plan ahead of the vote. 

Wheeler describes it as an effort to prevent the Internet from being taken over by big business interests, and says the proposal would ensure an "open" Internet. 

At its heart, the plan would expand the government's power to oversee Internet service providers and establish new rules to prohibit companies from blocking or slowing data. Open Internet rules had been in place but were recently knocked down by a federal court. 

Wheeler's approach attempts to erase any legal uncertainty by reclassifying the Internet as a telecommunications service and regulating it much like telephones. The rules would apply to both wireless and wired services. 

Wheeler and consumer groups say the move is necessary to prevent providers from creating slow or fast Internet lanes in which content companies like Netflix can pay to jump to the head of the queue. 

But Republicans and industry officials warn of a slippery slope that would discourage investment and innovation. 

Pai, in a joint Politico op-ed with Federal Election Commission member Lee Goodman, claimed that the "heavy-handed" plan would:

  • Regulate broadband rates 
  • "Decree" whether companies can offer "consumer-friendly service plans" like unlimited access to streaming music 
  • Effectively "institutionalize innovation by permission," prompting companies to seek "advisory opinions" from the feds for business plans, "for fear of what will happen if they don't" 
  • Claim the power to force companies to "physically deploy broadband infrastructure" 
  • Allow trial lawyers to file class-action lawsuits for any alleged violations of this plan 

The commissioners argued that the panel was conjuring the idea of "digital dysfunction" in order to "justify a public-sector power grab." They described this as part of a pattern -- with FEC members similarly discussing the possibility of regulating online political speech. 

Meanwhile, The Hill reported that Democratic Commissioner Mignon Clyburn has asked Wheeler to scale back the plan, potentially putting the chairman in a tough spot ahead of the vote. But Clyburn's office refused to comment on potential changes before the vote "out of respect for the deliberative process," her office said Tuesday.

Wheeler, though, is pushing back on the calls for a delay and defending the proposal itself. 

He tweeted that the future of the "open Internet" is at stake, and, "We cannot afford to delay finally adopting enforceable rules to protect consumers & innovators." 

He also noted that the commission received "more than 4 million comments on #OpenInternet during past year that helped shape proposal." 

"It's time to act," Wheeler tweeted. 

Asked Tuesday about the call for a delay, an FCC spokesperson also told FoxNews.com that the 4 million comments amounted to an "unprecedented" level of public response. 

"In accordance with long-standing FCC process followed in both Democratic and Republican administrations, Chairman Wheeler circulated his proposal to his fellow Commissioners for review three weeks before the scheduled vote. The Chairman has seriously considered all input he has received on this important matter, including feedback from his FCC colleagues," the spokesperson said. 

Wheeler's plan is by any measure an aggressive leap in Internet regulation in an industry that has so far seen little government oversight. The proposal calls for treating Internet service like a public utility, although Wheeler has said he would not use the new regulations to tell broadband providers how much to charge customers, as the law would allow. 

Industry is fighting this approach because it says it's only a matter of time before the rules grow more stringent and the FCC is regulating how much Internet providers can charge. 

The FCC is likely to adopt the new rules if the vote proceeds as planned, considering the Democratic majority on the commission. But the next stop may be the courts. Industry lobbyists say it's likely that one of the major providers will sue and ask the court to suspend enforcement pending appeal. 

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Assistant Professor

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

This explains it quite well: http://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2015/02/24/net-neutrality-what-is-it-guide/23237737/
If it is not passed then ISPs will be able to charge content providers by the amount of data they use. In other words, Netflix will be raising their prices.
This excerpt kind of says it all:
New Member

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

What I envision is what others are saying, license required based on content for all websites.  There is also the threat of censorship like there is on public radio and TV stations.  The First Amendment is out the window due to, if you make any political statement it will be considered a Political Contribution.  Your large companies like NetFlix and Blockbuster will be regulated until they are forced out or subject to over regulation. 

If the FCC (aka The Government) gets control of the internet and pricing we all will be screwed, blued, and tattooed.  After all the worst 9 words you can hear is; I am from the Government and here to help.  
Associate Professor

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

Just to think, if this doesn't go through, companies like AT&T can charge Netflix, AND you, thus Netflix charges YOU higher rates based upon how MUCH you watch from their services.  It's basically double-charging for the same piece of information.
Associate Professor

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

Sadly, we will in the long run NEED the FCC to have some power over the infrastructure, it IS a communications platform, and the way things are going as is, Big Brother has his hands in all communications in the states, this doesn't give the government anymore power to spy on us, just the potential for Big Companies like AT&T and Comcast to be screwed for screwing us for so long.
Assistant Professor

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

And AT&T, Comcast, etc, can give priority and cheaper rates to their own content providing companies while sticking it to the third party providers and the consumer.
New Member

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

This goes on all the time ATT owns the ATT servers that send the information to the customer.  It is like TV the Satellite or Cable Companies charge the Stations and Networks then charge the consumer.  There is charges on both ends this is just common business practices.  Just recently Dish and Fox (News Corp) had a heated battle over the rates Fox will pay to broadcast on Dish.  There was an agreement reached and Fox News was put back on Dish.  It is called competition Dish lost many customers due to Fox News not showing and their CHURN rate forced a compromise.  Will this effect the consumer not now but will later. 
Moderator

Re: FCC primed for vote on Internet regs, amid 11th-hour drama

Hello Gary,

Yet another interesting article! We are curious to see how this unfolds as well. Keep 'em coming!

Thanks
Amanda