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How is it legal to sell this service?

Assistant Professor

Re: How is it legal to sell this service?

aw... Don't let facts get in the way of a good "common knowledge" story, @maratsade 


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Professor

Re: How is it legal to sell this service?


@GabeU wrote:

This may have something to do with contracts or some other tedious law thing.


I believe it's just the way they contract.  Installation doesn't necessarily require the same level of knowledge and skill as that of troubleshooting and/or repair.  


Yes, exactly. 

Professor

Re: How is it legal to sell this service?

Oh, I know.  It's a big bad habit of mine -- picked it up in law school, I'm afraid.  I'm blaming them for this, and will contact a regulatory agency about it. Maybe the Better Business Ottoman (which is MUCH stricter with this kind of stuff than the Bureau). 

 


@MarkJFine wrote:

aw... Don't let facts get in the way of a good "common knowledge" story, maratsade 


 

Highlighted
Sophomore

Re: How is it legal to sell this service?


@maratsade wrote:

Oh, I know.  It's a big bad habit of mine -- picked it up in law school, I'm afraid.  I'm blaming them for this, and will contact a regulatory agency about it. Maybe the Better Business Ottoman (which is MUCH stricter with this kind of stuff than the Bureau). 

 


@MarkJFine wrote:

aw... Don't let facts get in the way of a good "common knowledge" story, maratsade 


 


Oh no, I accidentally listed the B B B as an regulatory agency.  The HORROR!

Re: How is it legal to sell this service?


@lighthope1 wrote:

Additionally, and I forgot to put it in my post, was that another HughesNet subcontractor was available and willing to come out and do the work, but HughesNet refused to use them.  Something about them being contracted for installations only and not repairs.  (I'm trying to recall this from memory, so the exact terms may not be accurate.)

 

  Maybe I'm missing something here,  but I choose who works on my system, not Hughes.  Found a good tech contractor years ago and have stuck with them since.

 

And yes, complaining to regulators is pretty useless.  The Better Business Bureau especially.  (I think it's hillarious that the initials for that organization is censored on this board.)


  Cl**ss Act**n Law***t is also verboten.  Smiley Embarassed)>


 

Distinguished Professor IV

Re: How is it legal to sell this service?


@gaines_wright wrote:
Maybe I'm missing something here,  but I choose who works on my system, not Hughes.  Found a good tech contractor years ago and have stuck with them since. 

The contractor you have is assuredly authorized to work on your system.  Were they not, they would not be doing so.  Nor would they get paid to do so were they to try.  It appears that lighthope1 is limited in who is authorized and available to work on his system. 

 

When one contracts for a service that uses proprietary equipment, only those authorized by that company to work on their system/equipment are allowed to do so.  i.e. only those authorized to work on Hughes' service can do so.  Only those authorized to work on DirecTV's service can do so.  It may be your home, but it's their service/equipment.


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit

Re: How is it legal to sell this service?


@GabeU wrote:

@gaines_wright wrote:
Maybe I'm missing something here,  but I choose who works on my system, not Hughes.  Found a good tech contractor years ago and have stuck with them since. 

When one contracts for a service that uses proprietary equipment, only those authorized by that company to work on their system/equipment are allowed to do so.  i.e. only those authorized to work on Hughes' service can do so.  Only those authorized to work on DirecTV's service can do so.  It may be your home, but it's their service/equipment.

 

  Actually, I'm not going to worry about who owns what, or who is authorized, if the thing isn't working I'm going to call the company I trust.  I've had Directv, Dishtv. Directway, Mainstreet, and Hughes, and none of these chose the company I use now to do the original installation. Much to my sorrow in the case of Dish, but that's another story.

 

   I chose the company I'm with now to redo the original Dish installation, to do the Mainstreet installaion,  to do the gen4 installation, and to replace my Hughes dish when it was knocked down by a EMT vehicle.  I didn't even call Hughes.    

 

  I suspect the company I use is authorized to work on just about anything.  But I really don't care.  My point being:  don't depend on the provider to chose your tech company -- find one yourself.

 

 

"Always listen to experts. They’ll tell you what can’t be done and why. Then do it!"

 

Lararus Long


    

Distinguished Professor IV

Re: How is it legal to sell this service?

@gaines_wright 

 

I was simply adding that caveat so no one gets themselves into trouble.  Unauthorized work on the system could cause the subscriber to be financially responsible for breaking the contract, as well as cause them to have to pay for the equipment worked on by an unauthorized contractor. 

 

You're certainly free to do as you wish, but anyone who reads this should ensure that any contractor they get to work on their HughesNet equipment is authorized by HughesNet to do so.  If they choose to not do so they're choosing to be financially responsible for any charges they may incur as a result.  If they own their equipment the equipment wouldn't come into play, but the service itself, and the existing contract, if there is one, still would.  


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit