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Hughenet and the future of television

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New Member

Hughenet and the future of television

With television moving more and more to online/on demand products, how is Hughesnet preparing itself to meet this trend?

Currently, Hughesnet's punishing and wildly unpopular FAP is not compatible with services like Netflix or on demand programming that Dish or DirecTV offer without either significantly downgrading the quality or quantity of downloaded programming.

As the future moves more toward high def, on demand downloaded programming, what is Hugheset doing to make this accessible to its subscribers?
8 REPLIES 8
Assistant Professor

Re: Hughenet and the future of television

Can't speak for HughesNet but I seriously doubt satellite internet will ever be able to supply the same kind of streaming capability cable and fiber do. Not in the foreseeable future with current technology at least. The capacity just isn't there, not even if and when the new satellite in 2016 comes online.

Satellite is not meant to compete with ground based internet providers, it is meant to provide a reasonably fast connection for those who only have dial-up or very poor DSL as other options. I doubt there will ever be an unlimited plan or even something like 150GB Anytime data. 

PS: Other ISPs are actually moving more toward monthly capped data. The streaming of TV and movies is putting a huge burden on their capacity also.
WJA
New Member

Re: Hughenet and the future of television

I can't speak for Hughesnet either, but when I signed up I signed up for Internet, NOT for TV or movies. Even when I lived in the big city and I had Comcast (and boy did I have issues with them) I did not expect to use the Internet for TV and movies. Hughesnet provides Internet where it might not otherwise be available. That in and of itself counts for something. Now they are providing phone service which saves me $70 a month over AT&T and is a damn sight better and a lot more dependable than AT&T. When you sign up with Hughesnet you know what you are getting as far as data allowances, how you use them is up to you and when they are gone they are gone.  I don't like it but that is the nature of the animal and sometimes it means if I am going to do some heavy duty data transfers I have to wait until the "Bonus" period to do so. Hughesnet provides what the big boys won't and I for one am grateful for it. Like any other resource you have to use it responsibly
New Member

Re: Hughenet and the future of television

I'm not sure what Hughesnet is doing about it, but it seems like a problem that should be solvable.  I'm using Aterlo NightShift, which uses my bonus bytes to pre-load shows onto my router that I can then watch anytime I want.  It would be great if Hughesnet just built something like this into their modems.
Assistant Professor

Re: Hughenet and the future of television

Jeffrey, NightShift is a great solution for those who want to save a stream during Bonus time to watch later. It however doesn't solve the problem for those who want to watch something during the evening in real time that they just stumbled across and not wanting to wait the next day after saving it.

Many folks simply want to go to Netflix or other service and browse through the listings, pick something and watch it right then.

Also it doesn't fix the capped data during both Anytime and Bonus periods which as I said will most likely always be present.
New Member

Re: Hughenet and the future of television

It's true you have to plan ahead, although I mostly watch TV series and it always downloads the next few episodes.

And yes, the bonus bytes are still limited.  But maybe if Hughesnet just built this into their standard service they could make it unlimited just for NightShift.  I'm just speculating though.
New Poster

Re: Hughenet and the future of television

Jeffrey the only problem with that is the customer would have to have one of the few Asus routers that support NightShift
Moderator

Re: Hughenet and the future of television

Hello Lighthope,

While we cannot give you a direct, fully developed answer, I can say we are working to the future. HughesNet has always lead satellite technology and does a very good job of providing internet service to people who would otherwise be without. However, satellite is always limited, as is almost anything not delivered by a physical line, so that will most likely always be the case. Dish Network and DirecTV offer show recordings, playback features and other things that do not require an internet connection.

All that we can do is provide as much capacity as we can and deliver it. In 2013, only 30% of the Boomer Generation used streaming media once a week, while about 46% of Generation X (34-47 years old) used streaming media once a week. Break that down to a percentage of that demographic that lives in a rural area and subscribes to HughesNet, I expect the number to be very low. HughesNet has already increased all Gen4 plans Bonus Bytes by 40GB, added the SmartBrowsing feature, as well as tweaking and updating other plans to have higher download allowances over all.

We understand that there is a need, however only so much can be changed once we have launched a satellite and the internet moves at a very different pace. We are always open to suggestions and ideas that can work on satellite services to pass on to our development teams.

Thank you,
Amanda
New Member

Re: Hughenet and the future of television

I understand your answer.  While many people have confused capacity and infrastructure (plenty of former, limited by latter), it is the nature of the beast that your infrastructure will always be behind demand.  You can't decide next week to launch ten more satellites or double your gateways by the end of the month.

I was speaking more toward the present and future.  While you cite some interesting stats, there is no question that the internet changes, and you even noted that.  While only a percentage of television programming is delivered on demand through the internet, that number is growing and will likely become the dominant delivery method in the near term.  Even eliminating teleivsion from the equation, files themselves are becoming larger, Windows 10 will be delivered exclusively via download, and YouTube is moving toward HD.

Yes, it is true that satellite internet is the last choice of any sane individual, but that does not and should not mean that those of us who are stuck with it should be left behind.

You did ask for suggestions and ideas.  I know I've read some interesting ones, though some would require partnering with providers.  (For example, why doesn't Dish Network allow you to schedule on demand programming for certain hours?)

There are only so many things that are within your power to control.  In this case, that being infrastructure to handle increased capacity.  A nice step was the Ultra plan (not available in my area).  50gigs/anytime is nice.  It will only be a few years before 50gigs/month will be considered highly crippling again.

I think you said it yourself.  "All that we can do is provide as much capacity as we can and deliver it."  So I guess ultimately that is what we're asking: how much and when?