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Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

New Poster

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

Thanks for replying but I did do all that. The only thing odd that happened was that a power strip stopped working. But after power cycling all devices, and checking connections,  all the lights are on as per usual. Only no dial tone. I tried both corded and cordless (new) phone.
Also, I am unable to see what ports are open or closed. In the past, and with my service in SF I am able to go to 192.168.0.xxx and see everything and port forward if necessary. All I get now is a very uninformative Hughesnet page.
Moderator
Moderator

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

Hmm, well I know for HughesNet Voice, after following our troubleshooting steps for no dial tone, one of the possible solutions is to replace the ATA, which is the unit we provide to connect to your router and phone. Other than that, I can't really advise anything for your phone service, that would be best for your phone service support.

-Liz
Please create a new thread in the community if you have a question or need help. Unsolicited Private Messages may not get replies.
New Poster

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

I'll ask them to replace it. But could you tell me why your phone service is so expensive relative to the other options?
Associate Professor

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

Can't really port-forward with Hughesnet...  Since it's a major CGN, port-forwarding would be pointless, though they leave all ports up, sometimes the NAT just goes belly up somewhere.

Have you attempted to toggle WebAcceleration?  
Does this device support IPv6?  
If it does support IPv6, is there a way to disable the IPv6 function in it?  
You do not have the device connected to the router in your home, do you?  If it's going Hughes Modem > Router > VOIP Device, you need it to go tthis way, Modem > VOIP > Router.

However, if your VOIP device wont pass traffic like that (some don't have a second NIC), you may need Modem > Switch > VOIP and Router.


As for the cost of phone service - that's honestly why I went with StraightTalk, $15/month, decent service, uses cellphone towers and a cell base that connects to home phones.  Hughes could never offer service cheap enough in the terms of VOIP to offset the potential for outages in bad weather.
New Poster

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

Wow, you have cell service? Why don't you just use your cell?
We don't have any cellphone towers we can connect to, if we did this wouldn't be such an issue, as it is it's kind of dire, out in the middle of nowhere with no way to quickly call anyone in an emergency.
I realize that with Hughesnet Voice you set it up modem-voip-router but with ITP it's modem-router-voip and that's the way it worked for over 2 years. If the problem was the way it's set up why did it work for 2 years? it just suddenly stopped last week. Why a switch? No IPv6.
"WebAcceleration?" If that were the issue wouldn't I be seeing some trouble with loading web pages?
Ok I read up on CGN. So I am not actually getting anything that is not filtered, I'm not connected directly to the internet. Cool. That's why nothing is customizable. And why does that info make me feel that it is more than likely they might just block some protocol that is inconvenient? How could I ever find out? 
Advanced Tutor

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

One thing you can do to try and answer this question is to access the online Shields Up port scanner tool  from a PC with all firewalls and anti-virus software disabled.

You'll need to use the User-Specified Custom Port Probe to test specific ports above the first 1,056 ports. Click Proceed, then enter a port number in the text box in the middle of the page below where it reads, "You may select any service from among those listed above . . ." and click the User-Specified Custom Port Probe bar below the box to scan a specific port.

From the Shields Up web site:
Detecting Ports Blocked by Your ISP

Internet service providers often block specific traffic entering their network before it reaches their customers, or after leaving their customers before it exits their network. This is sometimes done to block the exploitation of common security vulnerabilities, and sometimes to prevent their customers from offering proscribed Internet services.

As a customer, it can be useful and interesting to know which service ports, if any, an ISP has chosen to preemptively block in order to restrict their customers' global Internet traffic.

ISP port blocking can be easily tested, often quite rapidly, by arranging to allow the ShieldsUP! probe to have access to an unprotected computer. Since all non-stealth machines will respond to every open request — either affirmatively or negatively — ports appearing as STEALTH will be those blocked by your ISP, corporate firewall, or other external agency.

If your system is unprotected, without any personal firewall or NAT router, any ports showing as stealth  are being blocked somewhere between your computer and the public Internet. This is probably being done by your ISP. Internet traffic directed to your computer at the stealth ports will be dropped before reaching your machine.

If your system has a personal firewall that can be instructed to "trust" a specific remote IP, you can temporarily instruct it to trust the ShieldsUP! probe IP of [4.79.142.206]. If, after doing so, most of the service ports change to either open  or closed , you have succeeded and any which remain stealth are being blocked by your ISP.

If your system is operating behind a residential "NAT" router, the router will be acting as a natural and excellent hardware firewall. But that's not what you want for the moment. You can temporarily remove your NAT router and connect an unprotected computer directly to your cable modem or DSL line. Or, if you are comfortable reconfiguring your NAT router, you may be able to point the router's "DMZ" at one of your computers which has been instructed to "trust" our probe IP of [4.79.142.206]. If, after doing so, most of the service ports change to either open  or closed , you have succeeded and any remaining stealth are being blocked by your ISP.

Finally, if your Internet security system, NAT router, personal firewall, or whatever, can produce detailed logs of incoming Internet packets, you could leave your existing security in place, clear your log, run the service ports scan, then carefully inspect your log for any consistently missing port probes. We send out four sets of probing packets because individual packets are sometimes dropped along the way. Therefore, it won't be unusual to see occasional missing packets from your logs. What you're looking for is a complete lack of packets bound for a specific port. A careful and detailed examination of your log will reveal any missing ports which are being blocked before they reach your logging tool. (Note that this technique is not quite as foolproof as the other approaches since ISPs could be blocking outbound packets from their customers, which the other approaches would detect but log-watching would not.)

After completing the experiments above, remember to return your system to its previous tight security and verify that everything is safe again by re-running any of our tests.
El Dorado Networks |Diamond Springs, CA | eldoradonetworks.com
Associate Professor

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

Because the amount of data I get would cost more than twice as much as on Hughesnet...?

Would be nice if you could humor me and connect the VOIP unit directly to the modem - they don't have to be connected to the router with your VOIP unit, the modem will give you upto 5 IP addresses for your LAN, which is why people use a router, they tend to have too many devices.

Doing this would at least eliminate any routing issues, and router issues due to double-nat.
Advanced Tutor

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

And, technically, the modem has a router built into it so it satisfies your Vendor's requirements to connect their device behind a router Smiley Happy
El Dorado Networks |Diamond Springs, CA | eldoradonetworks.com
Advanced Tutor

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

Because the amount of data I get would cost more than twice as much as on Hughesnet...?
BTW, our Comcast service here at home has been offline all day because of a storm. So I'm tethered to my Verizon phone to get connected (My Gen4 system is at the office). I just got a text message from Verizon that I was nearing my 2GB limit and could buy another 1 GB of Data for $10 (advertised as a "Special" price). Last time I checked, it was $9 for 1 GB and $16 for 2 GB on HughesNet.
El Dorado Networks |Diamond Springs, CA | eldoradonetworks.com
New Poster

Re: Is Hughesnet blocking other VOIP choices?

Sorry, didn't mean to be so snarky, I was getting frustrated.  I'll try moving the device before the router when I'm back there after Thanksgiving. I would have tried it by now if I were there.
Still, it must be nice to have the option of using cellular service, we can't. It's like there is a cone of silence over the area, it's an absolute blank now since everything went 3g (no 4g nearby) before if I stood on top of the truck at the top of the hill and waved my phone around I could maybe get a text. Smiley Happy