cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

New Member

Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

Spring and Fall have always been a problem for Satellite TV and now Internet.  Even back in the C-Band days Solar Flares would cause a brief disruption of Satellite service.  While these big old dishes weren’t effected by rain or snow Solar Flares would turn them into static prone machines.
Last week I kept getting  a message on my DirecTV screen saying solar flares has caused signal degradation.  I read this morning on sciencedaily.com that these disruptions can now be predicted before they hit the low orbit Satellites and now maybe compensated for.  If they can be seen coming then it seems possible technology can be made to correct for them.

The Deep Space Climate Observatory, or DSCOVR, spacecraft will orbit between Earth and the sun, observing and providing advanced warning of extreme emissions of particles and magnetic fields from the sun known as Coronal Mass Ejections or CMEs which can affect power grids, communications systems, and satellites close to Earth. DSCOVR will also observe our planet and provide measurements of the radiation reflected and emitted by Earth and multi-spectral images of the sunlit side of Earth for science applications.

DSCOVR's orbit will be at what is called the L1 point in space. L1 means the Lagrange point 1 which is approximately one million miles from Earth. Once launched, it will take approximately 110 days to arrive at its orbit.

At L1, the gravitational forces between the sun and Earth balance the centrifugal forces of a satellite to provide a quasi-stable orbit point requiring fewer orbital corrections (and therefore reducing fuel consumption) for the spacecraft to remain in its operational location for a longer period of time. Placing DSCOVR in orbit around the L1 point provides definite advantages, including the quality of the solar wind observations.

The L1 position will provide DSCOVR with a point of "early warning" when a surge of particles and magnetic field from the sun will hit Earth, if they have characteristics that will cause a geomagnetic storm for Earth. Unlike other satellite orbits that circle around Earth, spacecraft at L1 can always stay on the sunward side of our planet making it an ideal location for monitoring incoming solar wind. The amount of early warning ranges from approximately 45 to 30 minutes depending on the speed of the coronal ejected particles, but nonetheless, a sufficient amount of time for spacecraft and power grid operators to take appropriate actions to protect the systems from catastrophic failure


10 REPLIES 10
Moderator
Moderator

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

Good timing, Gary. I think there was a CME just late last week.

-Liz
Please create a new thread in the community if you have a question or need help. Unsolicited Private Messages may not get replies.
New Member

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

For sure it even effected Digital TV satellites but back in the day the analog C-Band systems would go to nothing but static on every channel.  I use to track them by swinging the dish from East to West so I could inform Customers which Satellite they could point to and receive a signal.  At times there was the same programming on different birds.  I got pretty good at pinpointing them but in cases where there was only one sat with the channel like CNN on Galaxy 5 transponder 5 all you could do was wait for 15 to 20 minutes for it to pass.  I still miss my old C-Band had a 10 foot mesh screen with a 27 degree LNB I could pickup all the NFL games using the Feed the NFL was sending to their Stations.  Got the whole game without commercials.  But later Video Cypher and Hex Decimal Programming ended that fun. 
New Member

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

Gary !!!!  come outta of yesteryear !!!!LOL !!!!
New Member

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

Well Christopher they still affect things today just last week I lost a few channels on my DirecTV due to those little buggers.  It may even explain some midday problems with HughesNet the past couple of weeks.  What happens is in the Spring and Fall the Sun moves over the Equator and at times aligns with the Satellite and the Dish and the radiation (gamma and inferred rays) from solar flares interfere with the signal.  The old systems were analog and the effects were worse but they exist today.  However I still watch Star Trek (original) and Batman (original) remember Adam West and Burt Ward, and not to forget Gunsmoke.  I like my antenna TV and METV the DirecTV is for my Wife.
New Member

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

Gary , i was pulling your leg !!!   know it still and always will unless tec, finds a way around it !!!   don't see that happening in my life time  !!!!
New Member

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

With the new technology and L-1 orbit DSCOVR it just may from what I have gathered it has already been launched or soon to be in January 2015 it was ready to go. Any way I was just yanking your chain anyhow, but I do like Sci-Fi and Science both old and New with a little Weird thrown in for good measure.
New Member

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

heck the weather channel showing we gonna burn up in the sun in about 6 million years or so lol !!!!    LOL  !!! 

Highlighted
New Member

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

You're too funny Christopher!
New Member

Re: Satellite Solar Flair Problem may be coming to a end

I know !!!  ,  Morning Purgatory !!!