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Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers

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Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers


@Michael57 wrote:

I'm not suggesting my price needs to be lowered, but I am suggesting that the parameters that distinguish the plans may no longer make much sense.  This isn't specific to HN, lots of industries and corporations are doing and/or have done similar reviews.  


Sure it does, because people can still choose how much high speed data they get each month before they are throttled.  Some subscribers having speed issues does not mean all subscribers are having speed issues.  As well, the vast majority of the speed complaints are regarding streaming, which is one activity.  If someone is having speed issues significant enough for there to not be much of a difference between throttled and unthrottled they have the option of lowering their plan to whatever level they like, including the lowest, and that option has always been there.  They also have the option of troubleshooting the issue, and if the issue can't be fixed they likely have the additional options of a discount or cancellation.  I like my plan and I would like to keep it, and I'm sure many others would like to keep their plans as well.

 

And don't concern yourself with my attitude.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
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Freshman

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers

I've been on the Internet since the dial up days; I've been a web developer for 20 years; I know what slow Internet is. We certainly have not been able to stream video once since activation, much less barely log into this website (the Captcha times out!). Often I just walk away from the computer while waiting for a site to load.

 

"Alleged." Your gaslighting mojo is strong, Gabe! Smiley LOL

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Distinguished Professor III

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers

"much less barely log into this website (the Captcha times out!)."

 

There's a captcha for this website?  

Highlighted
Freshman

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers

Yes @maratsade, there is a Goog Captcha for retrieving/resetting a password, at least.

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Distinguished Professor III

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers

Wow. I've never seen it.  Not disbelieving you, mind. Smiley Happy

 


@erehwontsol wrote:

Yes, here is a Goog Captcha for retrieving/resetting a password, at least.


 

Highlighted
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers


@erehwontsol wrote: 

"Alleged." Your gaslighting mojo is strong, Gabe! Smiley LOL


I'm not gaslighting, but rather using the term in the strictest sense, as in claimed but not shown.   

 

Interesting about the captcha.  


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
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Junior

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers


@maratsade wrote:

Michael, you mention "the parameters that distinguish the plans." What parameters are those, outside of the difference in amount of bandwidth?  I'm likely forgetting something here and I sense a facepalm coming, but aren't all the plans equal except for amount of bandwitdh? (and of course, price, which depends on the bandwidth package). 


That's a good question.  You're right, today the only difference is the amount of data you can consume before your bandwidth is reduced.  However, there are several "knobs and buttons" that can be pushed to change the behavior or plans if it made sense.  Obviously, I know very little about the HN's specific capabilities and how they can be integrated into their billing system, so I can only speak in generalities, but things like:
Tiered Caps (with more realistic speeds)

Different after hours timing

Different prioritization profiles

are doable with most networking equipment.

 

Assume a customer signing up today (or even when I signed up in March), how can they make an educated decision as to which plan will meet their needs?  It's actually really hard...Today the data caps have been relaxed and prioritization is happening, but there's been no specific information provided about the prioritization or the way the new caps behave. School and business apps have been prioritized, but which ones and to what degree?

 

No one alerted me to the current situation when I called to sign up, in fact the rep specifically told me that 25mbps is available at my address.  Now that really just meant I had access to a gen5 satellite, and I understand that's more of an "up to" statement, but a rep saying that today to someone at my location, is not making a good faith statement unless they also disclose the current situation (and I'm not saying they are or are not doing that).

 

Since my speed tests are at or above the advertised speed, the obvious culprit for my slow speed when accessing any other resource over the internet is the prioritization which is a result of the high congestion.  Given that prioritization is spanning the network, it's safe to assume that the vast majority of subscribers are seeing speeds that are susbstantially less than normal.  How many and to what degree?  I have no idea, but that would be the driving factor behind re-calibrating the plans.

 

And @GabeU you're being a righteous jerk, to put it very mildly.  I'd go back to the first question I asked, do you have any data on the speeds folks are seeing across the network?  Obviously, the need to put things like prioritization in place, to pick and choose which conent to throttle and how hard, is a good indication of high levels of congestion that could otherwise cripple a network.  Look, I'm totally fine with disagreement, and can agree that I could be wrong, but you are using a straw man when characterizing my statements and basically dismissing my perspective out of hand, without providing any real substantive data.  To each their own, I guess.

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Senior

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers


@moosecreeklane wrote:

Newly installed hughesnet internet.

 

Normal internet usage is painfully slow. Websites load slowly, social media constantly buffering and not loading, video calls for work are interrupted, etc.

 

When I run speed tests, the numbers come back high, like more than 40mbps. But this is NOT a 40mbps internet experience.

 

What are my options?

 

https://testmy.net/quickstats/mgreene


With regard to the slow speeds despite good speedtests, it does seem to come down to prioritization, traffic shaping, etc.  And not all of it comes from HughesNet.  Other places are throttling their speeds as well, so even if HughesNet has it wide open, you still would be getting slow speeds because the hosting site is slow.  This would explain why some sites are slow while you get rocket speeds duing a speed test.

 

What are your options?

 

That kind of depends on how much speed you need.  I've found that, except for watching YouTube or downloading large files, my internet experience is pretty much unaffected whether I am throttled or not.

 

The plans will give you the top available speed as long as you have the data available.  Unless you are being prioritized, which I think is what HughesNet is doing to videos.  They may be doing it to others, but idk.

 

The question becomes: Can you live with throttled speeds? If yes, then drop your plan to a lower tier. If not, then keep it at a higher tier.

 

But as I said, some of the speed issue is coming not from HughesNet but from the outside.  Not much they can do about that.

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Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers


@Michael57 wrote:

Since my speed tests are at or above the advertised speed, the obvious culprit for my slow speed when accessing any other resource over the internet is the prioritization which is a result of the high congestion.  Given that prioritization is spanning the network, it's safe to assume that the vast majority of subscribers are seeing speeds that are susbstantially less than normal.  How many and to what degree?  I have no idea, but that would be the driving factor behind re-calibrating the plans.

You might want to read that prioritization policy again and not make the mistake of assuming all of your issues are the result of prioritization rather than system load and congestion. 

 


@Michael57 wrote: 

And @GabeU you're being a righteous jerk, to put it very mildly.  I'd go back to the first question I asked, do you have any data on the speeds folks are seeing across the network?  Obviously, the need to put things like prioritization in place, to pick and choose which conent to throttle and how hard, is a good indication of high levels of congestion that could otherwise cripple a network.  Look, I'm totally fine with disagreement, and can agree that I could be wrong, but you are using a straw man when characterizing my statements and basically dismissing my perspective out of hand, without providing any real substantive data.  To each their own, I guess.


No, but evidently you do.  After all, you seem to want to put all subscribers into a category of extreme speed issues.

 

And I never said the system wasn't experiencing congestion, nor have I dismissed the significance of the prioritization policy they have in place.  And I'm not dismissing your perspective, just your baseless assumptions, including the two above.  

 

And a righteous jerk?  That's nice.  I'm simply refuting your assumptions, as stated, but if you want to consider me a righteous jerk for doing so, have at it.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
Highlighted
Junior

Re: Slow internet but speed tests show high numbers


@GabeU wrote:

You might want to read that prioritization policy again and not make the mistake of assuming all of your issues are the result of prioritization rather than system load and congestion. 

 

Actually, it's not an assumption (and to be fair, I did say the prioritization is a result of congestion).  If congestion or system load were the primary factor, then a speedtest would result in similar speeds to other traffic.  Congestion, without prioritization, is a ceiling.  

 

 


@GabeU wrote:


No, but evidently you do.  After all, you seem to want to put all subscribers into a category of extreme speed issues. 

 

Actually, I stated just the opposite.  That I don't have this data, and I have said a couple of times that this data should be what would drive any evaluation of the plans.  Again, a straw man...I never said that everyone should be treated as if they have extreme speed issues. 

 

I am, however, making an educated guess that since system wide changes were put in place (ie. prioritization and cap changes), that there are system wide effects.  It's a very reasonable assumption.  You can also see it in the comments here, I've seen many folks here (even the advocates) indicate that things like streaming, are pretty much impossible across the board.  That's a significant change from normal.

 

Look at some point, when X% of your customers can no longer be served at good faith advertised values, it's time to take a look at those values, to check and see if should be re-evaluted, if customer segements need to be created, or if customers can be better served with more tailorable options that better fits their habits, or all of the above.