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Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

Honorary Alumnus

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

I'm late to the party and am on an old WinXP drive so I can't run or post screenshots of Glasswire but you do wish to exclude "local" traffic. That is LAN side activity and that does not cross over to the modem so does not get deducted from our allowance.

Think having a local storage drive filled with GB's of stored movies. You start up a media center computer to feed a movie from that drive to a TV. That is LAN side local traffic.
One does have to be careful of the settings of any "control software" installed on that drive to insure it doesn't "sync" to some external database such as IMDB to provide "poster graphics and other movie trivia material.

EDIT: Home network are getting so complex these days it has gotten to the point that having a router with traffic data is almost essential.

I still am amazed at the amount of connection "time" the wife's iPad spends connected to various services while in a hibernation state. The Asus 3100 shows every connection.... even to time,com to sync its clock.
Distinguished Professor III

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

He was able to exclude the local traffic in Glasswire using the options.  All of the excess activity was from his external drive used for automatic backups.  There was 1.4TB of data just from that. 

AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
New Member

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

Thanks.  I think we agree.  I don't have any of that fancy stuff yet like a "smart tv".  The bulk of the storage are "movies" of our Township Board screaming at each other every two weeks.
We have a new Board now that I sponsored and they are behaving much better.


Highlighted
New Member

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

I have two router/modems each with 4 ports, and two 8 port switches.  One older HP printer doesn't like to be switched between the two local networks and I often have to manually reinstall it.


New Member

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

Once the current 6 backup cycle is complete, I will revisit which directories are backed up.  No need to make copy after copy of these videos which are typically 6GB each.
I don't even remember setting up the backup schedule.  I think Acronis snuck that in on me behind my back.  Sneaky software.


Moderator

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

Hey William

I'm there with Gabe - I think your glasswire is tracking local traffic to your external HDD. I see on your Glasswire screenshot the usage is from August to January. In the future I'd recommend looking at a smaller cycle to get a better idea of what's going on. Keep us in the know! Smiley Happy

Amanda
New Member

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

Yeah.   Thx Amanda.   Previously I had been able to zoom in on the first single 750GB event which was in December.  Last night when Gabe asked for the screenshot, I wasn't able to find it quickly (or at all, in the graph at the bottom), and also was not able to quickly figure out narrowing that range (August to January).  I'll have to play more with Glasswire to become more skilled at using it.  Nevertheless, a bit disappointed in the reporting of the "upload" event which was:

App: System   Host:  Seagate-41257D   Traffic Type:  Microsoft-DS Active Directory

If it had been a real leak, this information isn't terribly helpful.  As it is, we deduced that it must be the backup process by looking at the surrounding evidence instead of the direct evidence.

Distinguished Professor III

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

Actually, it's more helpful than you think.  By it telling you the host, you're able to see where it's going (in this case the Seagate Drive).  If it was an external leak, as in using the internet, the host information would again tell you where it was going.  Very often a Google search can tell you just what and where that host is, and what it is used for. 

You'll get the hang of Glasswire over time.  It's a lot of info to sort through but very helpful once you get used to its ins and outs, no pun intended.  LOL. 


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
New Member

Re: Using Glasswire to determine a "Leak" (in this case a gusher)

I would have preferred that the App be Acronis instead of System, and that the Seagate be referred to as the Destination instead of the Host, and the traffic type be something meaningful, instead of Microsoft-DS Active Directory.   I wasted an hour Googling to find out what that was and obtained nothing useful.

With those 2 simple changes it would have been immediately obvious what it was.

As it was, I interpreted "system" as something unknown in the operating system, the Seagate to be the "source" of the data traffic, and Microsoft-DS Active Directory as the unknown destination (like OneDrive).