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Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

New Poster

Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

We have Hughes net as no other internet options are available. That means we get a limited amount of data, but we do not want to use it up fast. So I am asking is there a Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up all of our data? Or any suggestions?
7 REPLIES 7
Moderator
Moderator

Re: Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

Good morning hollyn1222,

Welcome and thanks for posting. Looks like a number of common routers have options in their settings to let you limit bandwidth, but I will defer to our community members who've had hands on experience them and have some specific devices in mind.

Here's some additional tips to help you manage your data allowance:

- more devices are capable of connecting to the internet: phones, tablets, gaming consoles, SmartTVs, and even refrigerators can connect wirelessly to the internet. Keep track of what devices you leave running on Wi-Fi.

- automatic-updates: your computer and any other programs you use will often keep working in the background, even if you're not actively using that program, in order to keep your system/program up-to-date. Anti-virus programs will periodically use your internet connection to check back with their malware database for any updates. You should have an option to turn off auto-updates and/or schedule them for a later time.

- multimedia content: Netflix, Hulu, YouTube, Facebook, Tumblr, Instagram, news sites, and other websites will contain videos, animated gifs, and sound clips that may start playing as soon as you land on the site. So much content, so easily available almost everywhere on the internet. For starters, try disabling auto-play video on Facebook:
https://community.myhughesnet.com/hughesnet/topics/how_to_disable_autoplay_videos_on_facebook
or adjusting your Netflix playback quality to SD: https://help.netflix.com/en/node/87

-DirecTV On Demand or the Dish Hopper can use A LOT of data, you may want to disconnect it when not in use.

- more data sources can be found here, as posted by a fellow community member: https://community.myhughesnet.com/hughesnet/topics/data-usage-sources-common-and-not-so-common

The most important tool to download is the Status Meter, available in the Customer Support Center, so download that if you haven’t already: supportcenter.myhughesnet.com

You may want to look into using a third-party data monitoring program to help you pinpoint the programs on your PC that use the most data. Community members have suggested and used GlassWire, so feel free to ask them for tips on using it: https://www.glasswire.com

Thanks,
Liz

Thanks,
Liz

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New Member

Re: Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

Good morning Hollyn1222,


As a new Hughesnet subscriber myself, my wife and I have been pleased with the service thus far.  We have not made it out of the first 20 days or resetting data but we also have a good understanding as to how the data cap internet works.  We currently at a minimum, shut off wifi on all our devices we are not using.

Here are a few of my suggestions.

1.  If you use Netflix, you CAN turn down the streaming quality.  My Roku box needs to have a series pressed on the remote like an old code on a Nintendo controller, and up pops a screen for streaming quality.  Also under Netflix itself via there webpage, once logged in, you can change your personal account settings and set the quality there.

2. As far as routers go, I have 2.  A belkin N600, and a old Netgear wireless G router.  I also have a netgear range extender.  Netgear products seem to work better with the Hughesnet HT1100 in my opinion.  The belkin did not work AT ALL with the HT1100 router supplied by hughesnet, they fought each other.  The belkin had what seemed to be hard programed security and wouldn't let me change certain things.  The HT1100 is hard programmed to assign IP addresses, and if you use a router like that Belkin N600DB I had, it to wants to assign the same IP addresses, and in return the router kept disconnecting and freezing.  Plus, with the built in security my PS4 couldn't get through the router and I always achieved a NAT Type Failed error..  UGH frustrating.  Switching to all Netgear products seemed to solve all the issues, and on both devices, the Router and Extender, I shut off DHCP.  So Hughes is the only thing assigning IP's.

3. My suggestion to you, and this doesn't quite answer your question but it helped me setting up my wireless with Hughesnet....  Get yourself a Router/Wifi router that doesn't appear to be extremely difficult to set up, and one you can turn DHCP off!  It just seems to work better with the HT1100 and let that Hughesnet HT1100 do the routing.  Then, just simply turn OFF devices your not using!  I can't stress this enough!!  If you don't want to shut the device off, get in the habit of shutting OFF wi-fi on your devices when you are not using them.  Then you should have no data leaks.  If everything is off, it cant use data!  Or even go as far as shutting of the HT1100.  If that is off, no one is getting to your data!  NO ONE!  :-)


I hope this helps and I didn't come off sounding to mean.


Have a wonderful day!


Eric

Honorary Alumnus

Re: Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

FYI:

The Hughes Modem is hardwired with a IP of 192.168.0.1.

This can not be changed and as Eric stated above any device attempting to share that IP address will cause problems.

It is recommended that the LAN IP of the Router be set to 192.168.1.1 to prevent IP conflicts.

Here is a repost of a basic router setup. (sans wireless which needs to be addressed separately)


A basic router installation starts with the initial wired connections and resolving any potential IP address conflicts between the Hughes Modem and the subscribers Router:
 
All devices are going to have an "IP Address" and if there is a conflict in those addresses then things are not going to work.
The IP address of the Hughes Modem is hardwired at 192.168.0.1 This address cannot be changed and it can not "shared" by another device on the network.
 
In many cases the default IP address of the Router in the same as or very close to the address that must be reserved for the Hughes Modem.
The suggested "LAN IP" address for a Router is 192.168.1.1
First lets look at the proper wiring:
 
     (click on pictures for larger image)
Here is the rear of a Hughes HT1100 modem:





It has a single LAN port (looks like a phone jack but larger). This is the "output" port of the Hughes modem. This is where a user would directly connect a single computer to the Modem if only using one computer or during any troubleshooting efforts.
 
It is also the port that will be used if a user elects to "network" their system by adding a Router.
The typical home Router has five (5) "ports" on its rear ... Four (4) LAN ports (Local Area Network) and a single WAN port (Wide Area Network) that is slightly offset from the other ports.
On some Routers the WAN port may also be labeled as "Internet". Here is the rear of a typical home Router showing all five ports:




An Ethernet cable is used make a connection from the Hughes Modem LAN port (depicted by the red arrow) to the Routers WAN (or Internet) port. This will be the one that is slightly offset from the other Router LAN ports.
 
Networking 101: Most consumer grade Routers consist of two parts: The WIRED and the WIRELESS portions of the Router. Before a "network" can be used, it has to be "created" first and this has to be done through a WIRED CONNECTION.

When set up we will have something that looks like this:

 

All Routers are going to have a "setup CD" or "Install Wizard" and I strongly suggest that you DON'T use these "automated" installation methods and instead do "manual" setup.
The reason I suggest this is that true "Broadband" is so prevalent in the US that the Router manufactures assume that all users fall within that category and have certain internal Router settings configured in a manner that can have issues with a Hughesnet connection.
 
I do strongly suggest going to your Routers manufactures website and obtain the user manual and "quick start" guide as these will contain valuable information including a couple of  VERY IMPORTANT TIDBITS:
 
#1: The "Default Address" (known as the LAP IP) assigned to the Router

#2: The default username and password needed to access the Routers internal settings pages.
 
The LAN IP of the Router if different than 192.168.1.1 is should be changed to that value. Consult your Routers "quick start guide" for that information.

IF THERE IS A CONFLICT IT MUST BE RESOLVED FIRST:

#1: Disconnect the Ethernet cable between the Hughes Modem and the Routers WAN port.
 
#2: With a single computer directly connected to one of the Routers LAN ports enter the "address" of the Router as per the manufactures documentation:
Using the manufactures documentation reveals a conflict with my old Netgear default LAN IP.


:

Using that info, while connected to the Router LAN port and no cable between the Router and the Modem will allow access to the Routers "internals" after entering the default username and password:




An important note: These default values MUST be changed to maintain network security and integrity.
There should only be ONE USER in the household that has the username and password to the Router.

Maintain a record of this info but it needs to be in a secure place ! Again, there should be ONLY ONE NETWORK ADMINISTRATOR !
 
Once that information is changed and entered you can enter and view the Routers internal settings including changing the Routers LAN IP to 192.168.1.1

All routers have a difference in their user interfaces as well as "bells & whistles" but some things are "universal" Here are some suggested settings:




 


The LAN TCP/IP Setup is where you would resolve an IP conflict between the Hughes Modem and the Router IP. Set it to 192.168.1.1 as shown in the above snip.

There are important aspects to consider yet such as Wireless setup and security and alternate DNS settings.

In the Next chapter we will cover basic wireless set up.



Honorary Alumnus

Re: Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

 and one you can turn DHCP off!  It just seems to work better with the HT1100 and let that Hughesnet HT1100 do the routing. 


I have to disagree on that point.

Having DHCP enabled in the router works very well.

The "router" portion of the HT1000/1100 Modem is limited to handing out addresses to only 5 devices and the Router in "switch" mode will take one of the five.

 

New Poster

Re: Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

how do you turn off the hughsnet wifi

Associate Professor

Re: Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Wifi router that limits data to devices, so it does not burn up our data, any suggestions?

@rick6

 

In the following PDF, look under 5.c. of "How do I manage my built-in Wi-Fi modem?"

 

http://customer.kb.hughesnet.com/Documents/1041318-0001_a.pdf

 

Edit:  Had the window open for a few minutes and didn't know Corrosive had answered. But, I will add this, make sure to click "Save Settings" after unchecking SSID enable for each of the four radios, as if you uncheck all four and then click "Save Settings", the setting won't hold (at least they don't for me).  So uncheck the SSID enable for the 2.4Ghz radio, then Save Settings, then 2.4Ghz Guest, then Save settings, and so on for the 5Ghz and 5Ghz guest radios.  


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