cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

New Poster

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

Hi Amanda!

Thank you for letting me know when engineering will call today.

As for the other day when it rang for a minute (I'm sure it must have), as I mentioned in a post above I was outside splitting wood and I did not hear the phone. As you might recall, engineering already was two days late calling me at all and no one had told me what time to expect a call. My wood stove is the only way to heat my home, so I have to attend to that from time to time. I also have to leave the house at other times as well, it's not like I'm constantly here. I can't imagine what this must be like for a HughesNet customer who works outside the home and has to wait for a call back from engineering when they're not told what time, or even accurately what day, to expect the call. 

I also can't imagine which Tier 1 support agent thought they were on the phone with me. I wasn't on the phone, I was in the wood shed splitting wood, as I said above. 

Again, I appreciate you letting me knowing when to expect the call today. However, I should not have had to have posted here and gotten your attention to receive good customer service. I think it must be highly frustrating to be a support tech at HughesNet given how little they are empowered to deliver good customer service (has to follow a script, can't transfer when a case is escalated, can't see prior notes, can't view accurate information about a customer's account, apparently no access to an in-house Knowledge Base, no Tier One senior techs to assist with difficult cases, must field several calls at once, etc.). 

I've been with HughesNet for about a decade and I suppose I'll see this out, too. As difficult as this is, HughesNet once was much, much, MUCH worse and I am in a position to recognize the improvement. We will see how things go today.

Thank you again and take care.
--Karen
New Poster

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

Gwalk900, I appreciate that you are a volunteer here and that you're trying to help elizabethvining. Most of what you posted is excellent.

However, you've lost me at "Did you also enable encryption on all wireless frequencies? Did you disable all Guest Accounts? Did you disable . . . disable . . . disable . . . "

I know of no other ISP that would expect a customer to know how to do all this. I have a fair amount of technical savvy, so I can do these things, but expecting a customer - even me - to know how is unreasonable. When a customer who is not technically savvy reaches a point where they can't resolve it on their own, tossing stuff like that at them only reminds them that they can't resolve it on their own and how helpless they are.

Not a good feeling.

I recommend not doing that. Just leave out that last bit and it'll be fine.

elizabethvining, I know it's very frustrating but I recommend you be a bit more patient. Folks here truly are trying to help you and Tier One tech support, as disempowered as they are, also will try to help you. I know it will take some work on your part, you'll have to prove to more than one tech that you actually have a problem, but you have the tools and abilities to do that.

Gwalk900's troubleshooting procedure is a good one, though it would be helpful to know how to get to the status meter. You download it here: http://services2.hughesnet.com/Status_Meter/

I know it may seem daunting to do your own troubleshooting but this really is a simple tool and, once you run it, you will have real information you can provide the folks who do want to help you. I don't know how much it will help as you might be having spikes in your phantom data loss, as I seem to be (my phantom data loss started to slow down yesterday). Constant problems are easier to detect and document than are intermittent issues. However, using this tool will provide at least some data and it will give you more certainty that something is being done, even if it's you who has to do it. 

Good luck!

--Karen
Honorary Alumnus

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

Karen,

Thanks for your input. Point well taken except ......

Hughes as an ISP makes data available to the Modems LAN port. They are not and can not be a personal "Computer Repair and IT Department".

In the past routers, switches and range extenders were only used by businesses and "techy" users.

Networking for the most part was not in everyday use by novice or even average users.

As more devices became more widely used Routers became a routine addition to households ... but "networking" knowledge did not keep pace.

Hughes, other than a single recent exception, simply doesn't "do networking". There are too many brands, models and versions spread over too many years of production for Hughes to offer support for these devices.

I can't count the number of times users have posted here in the Community "I have a password installed" and have no further understanding beyond that.

How do you suggest we introduce novice users to the more critical aspects of networking without referring them to some paid third-party?

While I certainly can understand frustration I could have phrased my response differently. I guess the "I want out" at the end rather than a "I don't know how" or "I don't understand". With that I would have asked for brand and model of the router being used and downloaded the manual and posted screenshots of the steps and settings.


 



Highlighted
New Poster

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

UPDATE: I just got off the phone with the engineering tech who called at 2:05 p.m.ish Central time (a little early but I was here). 

She really wants to replace the HT1000 modem as that model has caused problems like this. She reviewed my history, specifically when this was tried before (see post above for information about that). She said she would send out a tech to install the modem and that HughesNet will bear the cost of that.

The tech is to arrive between 2 p.m. and 5 p.m. Pacific Time Friday. I do expect to be home.

She said she will follow up with me on Monday, Jan. 2.

We'll see :-)

In other news, my data usage seems to be back to the crawl it usually is. After using 10GB in 7 days, I've used only a few hundred MB since yesterday. If that continues, I should have data remaining in my account when the tech gets here.

Also, this engineer was able to look at the notes on my account. I really think it would be helpful if Tier One technical support could be empowered to do this, too.

I'll come back Friday and let everyone know how it went.

Thank you again and take care.

--Karen
New Poster

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

Dumping equipment on customers, taking their money and then telling them, "We're not the Computer Repair and IT Department, toodles and, wow, it sure sucks to be you", is very bad business. 

A lot of the posts here are poorly worded and voice a great deal of frustration because the customer - yeah, remember? These are customers - are at their wits end by the time they stumble in here. The anger in their posts can be dismissed, it's nothing personal. They calm down pretty quick when the professionals pinpoint their problems and explain the solutions. If it's on HughesNet's side, then HughesNet should fix it (and if HughesNet sold the equipment to the customer, it's HughesNet's problem). If it's not on HughesNet's side, then the tech-on-the-phone should be ready with the steps the customer will have to take to resolve the issue.

The customer should never, EVER, be expected to understand the more critical aspects of networking. It's simply not necessary.

If HughesNet really wants to improve customer service (they have gotten better over the past decade; seriously, I could tell you stories), they need only look to ISPs who serve less captive customer bases. My daughter has Comcast. She's had some technical issues and Comcast has been able to resolve them in a timely, professional manner. Through it all, she has been educated not one little bit about the nuances of networking. There is no need.
Associate Professor

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

The customer should never, EVER, be expected to understand the more critical aspects of networking. It's simply not necessary.

More necessary as time goes on, as far as critical, most of what is posted here isn't critical, it's basic entry level, if that, information that is easily found on the manufactures website.  Believe it or not, if you have a non-secure wifi network, and someone does something illegal on it, the Government holds you responsible...  They no longer accept the ignorance of technology excuse, because most of what one is expected to understand is becoming critical knowledge as time moves on.
New Poster

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

Not sure what any of that has to do with anything. Unless HughesNet wants to start giving out legal advice about federal law to customers (I don't recommend that). 
Associate Professor

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

Le'sigh... You missed the point...  As technology and society progresses, if one doesn't learn or adapt, they will be stuck in the past, sometimes this is good, but many times it is not good.
New Poster

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

So it's HughesNet's job to force Luddites into that brave new world? Really?

How can that be? I'm not expected to know how to build a car to drive it, to know the ingredients of a cake mix to bake it or to have an advanced degree in medicine to undergo surgery. If anything goes wrong in any of those three endeavors, there are professionals standing by to assist. How can IT be any different?

We may have to agree to disagree on this point.
Honorary Alumnus

Re: Will an engineer call; Case ID 101950889

Hughes supplies service ... to the modem LAN port .... with one exception.
If a user chooses to "network" their connection then the creation and maintaince of that network is on the user.

The exception is a single Dlink router model that Hughes makes available and is supported by Hughes.
It has its LAN IP properly configured and certain settings set as default.
This goes a long way to keep novice users out of trouble and aids in troubleshooting.
Hughes does not just "dump" equipment on users.
Many of the ground based ISP's that you spoke of have their own wifi modems and of course have the ability to support them.
Hughes, thus far, does not offer a "wifi modem".

There are thousands of models of routers that span decades of production made by many manufacturers. Simply to many to support.
It is said that Hughes may offer a wifi modem in Gen5 but I would be concerned with such a device .... my router, my rules, my network.
While its true you don't have to know how to build a car to drive, you still have to take and maintain a level understanding to get a permit to operate it.