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Hughesnet HT2000W

New Poster

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

They are online gamers...we have never had satellite internet before. We just moved waaaaay out to the country and this is the only option we have for anytype of internet.

New Poster

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

Ok, well that did not do what I wanted it to do. So I am going to go back to the HT200W. The triband split the speed up to much that no one can do anything at all. I am just going to keep one computer hardwired and only use the 5g wifi and disable the other and see how that works.

Distinguished Professor II

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

@aarushing

 

Unfortunately, when it comes to satellite internet, many games will be unplayable due to the high latency (ping) mentioned by infinitytec, regardless of the connection method.  It won't really matter whether it's connected directly to the HT2000W via Ethernet cable or connected via WiFi.   It's one of the drawbacks of satellite internet.  

 

Turn based games are usually okay, but real time games, like action games, generally don't work well, if at all.  

 

From the FAQ page...  

 

Capture.JPG

The total round trip is actually about 90,000 miles.  One leg is about 22,300 miles, and there are four legs.  From your dish to the satellite, then back down to earth at the gateway, which is where your service actually "enters" the net, then back up to the satellite and back down to the dish at your home.  

 

 

As for the Nighthawk router splitting the speed, keep in mind that the total speed you're getting from the service will be split between devices that are actively using the net at the same time, though not necessarily evenly.  So, if you're getting 25Mbps, and you have two devices actively downloading from the net, that 25Mbps will be divided between those two devices, though, again, not necessarily evenly, as one device may be doing something that doesn't require much speed, while the other might be using all the speed it can get.  It would be the same with three, or four, or more devices actively using the net.  The available speed would be shared and divided between them. 


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Senior Instructor

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

Just to put a lag time on it, independent of channel speed or frequency :

22,300 mi * 4 legs *         sec        = 478.843 mSec (minimum)

       leg                       186,282 mi

 

[The speed of light is 186,282 mi/sec]


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Junior

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

I don't think I have ever seen my average latency being less than 600 ms. Given, I usually test on WiFi, which may contribute to that.
Ryzen 7 2700/16GB RAM/X470 Motherboard/250 GB m.2 SSD/2TB HDD/4GB RX560/Windows 10 Pro
Senior Instructor

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

Given it's around 500, add about 100 to the destination for anything added on the upstream route.

Add at least 200 if your upstream is Level3 going to Microsoft. Level3's connection to MS is abysmal right now.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Distinguished Professor II

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

In real practice I doubt very many people, if any, ever see a latency below about 550ms or so (aside of flukes, of course).  The stock info given is vastly simplified, and really only applies if someone lives directly below the satellite, in the middle of the ocean.   All of us actually have greater distances from the satellite than listed, and the further north, and the further east or west from the satellite we are, the more time it adds.  And, of course, the same goes for our gateway.  

 

And then, of course, there're all of the switches and such that the service goes through, which slows it down even more.  

 

I'm pretty far north on the east coast, and my gateway is pretty far north on the west coast.  I'm usually seeing latencies in the mid 600s.  

 

It's funny, but if you ever test your speed with Google's speed test, it evidently only measures the latency between their server and the gateway, so it gives you latencies of about 15ms to 30ms.  Smiley Tongue  


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Senior Instructor

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

I've got an algorithm to calculate the actual distance between a geosynchronous satellite at lat 0, long y, alt z, and your location at any given lat x', long y', alt z'.

 

It's almost as complicated as calculating the seven symbols on a stargate.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Professor

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

There’s an app now that calculates the symbols on stargates.
Senior Instructor

Re: Hughesnet HT2000W

Here's the process if you want to figure it out:
1. Get your location and the location of your gateway (North lats are positive, West longs are negative).
    Location of E19 is at lat 0, lon -97.1071, elev 35786000 m.
2. Convert all the locations from degrees to radians (e.g., φ * pi / 180).
3. Convert all three locations to a point in 3-space:
    Earth's radius: Er = √( [ (6378137²*Cos(lat))² + (6356752.3²*Sin(lat))² ] / [ (6378137*Cos(lat))² + (6356752.3*Sin(lat))² ] )
    Geocentric Lat: Glat = ArcTan( (1-0.00669437999014)*Tan(lat) )
    Point:
    x = Er*Cos(lon)*Cos(Glat) + elev*Cos(lat)*Cos(lon)
    y = Er*Sin(lon)*Cos(Glat) + elev*Cos(lat)*Sin(lon)
    z = Er*Sin(Glat) + elev*Sin(lat)
3. Calculate the path distances in km for each leg by taking the square root of the sum the squares of the differences in each direction and then dividing by 1000:
    Dkm = √(Δx² + Δy² + Δz²) / 1000 m/km
4. Calculate the minimum lag time by dividing twice the total path by the speed of light:
    Tlag(ms) = 2*(Dkm(dish to sat)+Dkm(sat to gateway)) / 299.7924 km/ms

Turns out the lag for me in C.Virginia to E-19, and San Diego and back is 500.54ms.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.