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An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...

Distinguished Professor IV

An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...

Video Data Saver Off...

 

VDS Off.JPGVideo Data Saver Off

 

Video Data Saver On...

 

VDS On.JPGVideo Data Saver On

 

This demonstrates how the Video Data Saver works to save one's data while streaming.  The speed throttling will limit one's streaming to no higher than SD, but this, at least for myself and many others, is an adequate resolution.  It can also help to save a considerable amount of data for those that watch a lot of Youtube videos.  

 

With this shown and said, while I used Netflix's own speed test for this, I DO NOT RECOMMEND USING NETFLIX'S SPEED TEST FOR SPEED TESTING.  First, it's not accepted by HughesNet as being accurate enough.  Second, the test with the Video Data Saver OFF used 65MB.  That's a LOT of data for a single speed test.

 

Edit:  In addition, the result given when the Video Data Saver was on may very well be an average, and may not accurately reflect the speed of the service when it is being throttled by the Video Data Saver while streaming.  It's more than likely that the REAL speed the Video Data Saver kicks the service down to is lower than the speed test reflects, as what is shown in the result is borderline enough to stream in HD, which the Video Data Saver is designed to not allow.         


AMD Ryzen 5 3400G | XPG SX8200 Pro 500GB M.2 NVMe SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB Corsair DDR4-3000 | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
10 REPLIES 10
Distinguished Professor I

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...

That's excellent, @GabeU. I had no idea that it worked by throttling speed during streaming.  I have been watching a lot more stuff on Netflix/Amazon/YouTube, and I've been very impressed -- it's SD but it looks just fine.  The only time when things get a little wobbly is in the evenings when the speed is reduced a lot, in general, and so the video gets pixelated every so often.

Associate Professor

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...

Yeup, higher resolutions need higher constant speeds for the video so it doesn't buffer constantly.  If you leave a player set to Auto Select the resolution, they generally determine the speed while trying to load the first bit of video, once determined this is stored in a cookie for future use.  So to get lower resolutions Hughes will throttle the speed of only known video streams, but also provides users a way to easily disable this feature.  Others like Verizon won't allow users to disable the "video data saver" on mobile service and restrict users to 480p or 720p depending on service plan.

New Member

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...

I am new to Hughes Net and so far everything I was told at install from Dish and Hughes Net very confusing and misleading. I have increased my data once so I could use my computer,  ...  I am getting some resolutions with issues but with the ability to watch VOD (free) 30 min shows on Dish without using all my data is not happening. I come from a free data enviroment so it's hard to understand,plus I am not computer tech savy.   I was told by Dish that I could do something with Video Data Saver to resolve this.  I was told by Hughes Net people no.  Are they both right?  I know I can record in the middle of the night but the shows I want.. can't do that.    Thank you in advance for your assistance.

Assistant Professor

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...

My NetWorx throughput meter avarages about 1.5 mbps with Netflix set to low definition. Kind of works out when using this calculator as I use about 250-300 MB for a normal 42-45 minute TV length show.

 

https://www.expedient.com/file-transfer-time-calculator/

 

Think it averages closer to 1 mbps when all said and done as it buffers at higher speed sometimes when it can but in the end the file size is the file size regardless the speed. I haven't relied on the VDS setting, have always set the definition (low)at the streaming end, nothing above 360p 99.9% of the time.

 

Guess I'm trying to say IMO, especially with Netflix from my experience, people would be better off setting their Netflix account playback preference to low rather than relying on the HughesNet VDS option. Just seems the VDS is relying on a secondary control when best to control it at the source if possible.

 

 

Assistant Professor

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...


@kgrantham wrote:

I am new to Hughes Net and so far everything I was told at install from Dish and Hughes Net very confusing and misleading. I have increased my data once so I could use my computer,  ...  I am getting some resolutions with issues but with the ability to watch VOD (free) 30 min shows on Dish without using all my data is not happening. I come from a free data enviroment so it's hard to understand,plus I am not computer tech savy.   I was told by Dish that I could do something with Video Data Saver to resolve this.  I was told by Hughes Net people no.  Are they both right?  I know I can record in the middle of the night but the shows I want.. can't do that.    Thank you in advance for your assistance.


VOD will eat your data, it is mostly HD with no control to make it lower. HD streaming is not wise with limited satellite data. The Video Data Saver will not work when the streaming provider  (Dish) has no option to stream at lower definitions.

Distinguished Professor IV

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...

@BirdDog

 

It definitely seems odd that the VDS only kicked the speed down to 3.1Mbps, as that's pretty close to being enough for streaming in HD.  I would have expected it to kick the speed down lower.  Then again, I don't really know how accurate that Netflix speed test is, and the real speed it gets kicked down to when streaming might very well be a good deal lower than what the speed test resulted in.  It's possible that the result is an average, in that when it first started the speed was higher, but then the VDS kicked in and brought it down considerably, and lower than what the result reflects. 

 

  I should really put an "asterisk" in that original post, as in it was only to demonstrate that the VDS works and what it does, but that those numbers may not reflect the actual speed the VDS will kick the speed down to when streaming.  After all, a short speed tests is a whole lot different than sustained streaming.   


AMD Ryzen 5 3400G | XPG SX8200 Pro 500GB M.2 NVMe SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB Corsair DDR4-3000 | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Assistant Professor

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...


@GabeU wrote:

@BirdDog

 

It definitely seems odd that the VDS only kicked the speed down to 3.1Mbps, as that's pretty close to being enough for streaming in HD.  I would have expected it to kick the speed down lower.  Then again, I don't really know how accurate that Netflix speed test is, and the real speed it gets kicked down to when streaming might very well be a good deal lower than what the speed test resulted in.  It's possible that the result is an average, in that when it first started the speed was higher, but then the VDS kicked in and brought it down considerably, and lower than what the result reflects. 

 

  I should really put an "asterisk" in that original post, as in it was only to demonstrate that the VDS works and what it does, but that those numbers may not reflect the actual speed the VDS will kick the speed down to when streaming.  After all, a short speed tests is a whole lot different than sustained streaming.   


I'm just not a fan of relying on the VDS across the board to limit video streams data use especially if the original site has an option to lower definition like Netflix and YouTube does. I honestly don't know for sure what VDS is doing other than recognizing a video stream and trying to choke the speed to force an automatic definition lowering IF the streaming site supports it.

 

Many sites and Dish/DirecTV On Demand do not allow lowering definition, they stream what they stream and in HD a lot of the time.

 

What I'm trying to say is in cases where sites only allow higher definition then the VDS will probably cause buffering and will still use a lot of data if the entire video is watched. As in no data saved because an HD file size is what it is regardless how slowly it downloads and the buffering.

 

I don't want folks thinking the Video Data Saver is some kind of magical thing that will reduce data usage in all cases. It should work on sites like Netflix and YouTube that offer lower defintions for most streams.

Distinguished Professor IV

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...

@BirdDog

 

Completely agree.  


AMD Ryzen 5 3400G | XPG SX8200 Pro 500GB M.2 NVMe SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB Corsair DDR4-3000 | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Assistant Professor

Re: An Example of the Video Data Saver at work...


@GabeU wrote:

@BirdDog

 

Completely agree.  


Personally think VDS is kind of useless if the originating site allows setting lower definition, then the user should set it to lower definition there not rely on VDS. A bit like the old idiot lights in cars, by the time it lit up your engine was toast.

Sites that only have HD streaming option should not be frequented by satellite internet users including on demand from Dish and DirecTV.