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Is anyone who has Hughes net actually able to stream things such as netflix?

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New Poster

Is anyone who has Hughes net actually able to stream things such as netflix?

Everytime I have tried to stream something on my tv it just buffers, I am fairly knowlegable when it comes to technology, I have run all the tests from my system control system, and it awlays says everything is working fine. Anybody have any helpful  information they could give to me? Thanks!

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Distinguished Professor II

Re: Is anyone who has Hughes net actually able to stream things such as netflix?

I don't stream much, but I haven't had any problems streaming from Netflix, Hulu, and Amazon Prime. I load the shows using a laptop that I connect to the TV via HDMI, and I have very little, if any, buffering, though it does depend on time of day, with prime time being worse. Congestion affects performance, so even if your system is just fine, congestion, added to latency, will affect streaming. 

 

But even though streaming normally works for me, I prefer to watch shows without any buffering at all, and in HD. To accomplish this,  I use an app called PlayOn Cloud which works like a cloud-based DVR and records shows without using data.  I then download the shows during the bonus bytes time (2 to 8 am), because downloading does use data, and then I can not only watch the shows without any buffering and in HD, but I can also save the files to watch as many times as I want, just like with a regular DVR.  

 

gobucks1966 wrote:

Everytime I have tried to stream something on my tv it just buffers, I am fairly knowlegable when it comes to technology, I have run all the tests from my system control system, and it awlays says everything is working fine. Anybody have any helpful  information they could give to me? Thanks!


 

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Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Is anyone who has Hughes net actually able to stream things such as netflix?

@gobucks1966 

 

The first thing to do is to check to make sure you are not out of plan data.  You can do so with the HughesNet Usage Meter, the HughesNet Mobile App, or the System Control Center.  If you're not out of plan data, it would be a good idea to run a few speed tests to see what your service speed is like.  The instructions for those tests are here.  Please be sure to thoroughly read the instructions before running the tests.  Once you've run a few, please click on "My Results" on the upper right of the testmy.net page, then copy and paste the "My Results" page URL here so that the test results can be viewed.  

 

One last thing to keep in mind is that, even with adequate speed, you can still have difficulty streaming, especially with services that use Progressive as their method of streaming, like Amazon.  The difficulty is often as a result of a combination of high latency, which is inherent to geostationary satellite internet, and congestion, which can vary from beam to beam.  That varying congestion also explains why streaming works well for some, but not for others.  Still, it can be caused by other things too, like low speed, whether that's as a result of being out of data or some type of technical issue, so it's always a good idea to check you're speed.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
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Junior

Re: Is anyone who has Hughes net actually able to stream things such as netflix?


@GabeU wrote:

 

One last thing to keep in mind is that, even with adequate speed, you can still have difficulty streaming, especially with services that use Progressive as their method of streaming, like Amazon.  .


That article is a very simplistic explanation, admittedly for good reason, but there's a lot of nuance involved.  It's not always mutually exclusive, as certain adaptive protocols use progresive downloads for their adaptive streaming techniques.  I suppose that could be latency sensitive, but it is definitely not using a single sized source file and is adjusting on the fly. 

 

Also Amazon Prime most definitely supports adaptive streaming: https://www.whathifi.com/us/reviews/amazon-prime-video

 

Amazon is also a well known "dog fooder" of their cloud services, and Prime Video is no different.  Anyone can use their services to create their own adapative streams:

https://aws.amazon.com/cloudfront/streaming/

https://aws.amazon.com/solutions/implementations/live-streaming-on-aws/

https://aws.amazon.com/elastictranscoder/

https://aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2016/05/amazon-elastic-transcoder-now-supports-mpeg-dash/

 

As written, I'm not sure any major providers use progressive downloads for most of their content.  I suspect that is more typical for folks using their own media servers like Plex etc.

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Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Is anyone who has Hughes net actually able to stream things such as netflix?

@Michael57 

 

Amazon must have recently changed their method of streaming, as it had been Progressive, not Adaptive.

 

Still, as has been seen in this community, Amazon seems to be the most problematic of the popular streaming platforms.

 

Interesting information, though.  


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
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Junior

Re: Is anyone who has Hughes net actually able to stream things such as netflix?

Nah, it's been awhile.  That article I linked for them adding MPEG-DASH to their transcoder was in 2016 and they already supported other adaptive protocols.  Plus they use their own stuff before making it publicly available.  Here's an example of them using MPEG-DASH from 2018, viewed by inspecting the payload.

https://mux.com/blog/thursday-night-football-streaming-technology-showdown-amazon-prime-vs-twitch/

 

Amazon has both the space (S3) to store multiple resolution formats of the videos and the compute (EC2) to transcode on the fly.  So I'd be suprised if they ever used straight up progressive downloads for most of their content, but I guess it's possible.

 

I won't argue that Amazon is more prone to problems on HughesNet than the other services.  That is something I don't have any insight into.