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eero Router behind Modem?

krevbot
New Poster

eero Router behind Modem?

As many people have made clear in the forums and elsewhere, high latency is a problem with all satellite connections because of the distance travelled.

 

However, I'm wondering if there is a router that can handle that latent connection. I have an eero router at home, and have recommended them to many people. They do WiFi really well in my experience, but don't know enough about the tech to know if a certain brand/model of router could do some sort of magic to make things work better.

 

Obviously Hughes.net deploys with its own stock modem/router as default. I'm simply wondering that if I disable the router functionality, and plug an eero behind it, would it get me anything.

 

I may experiment just to see what happens. Just curious if anyone had thought about this before.

 

Thanks!

3 REPLIES 3
MarkJFine
Associate Professor

Re: eero Router behind Modem?

Latency is latency. You can't get signals to get where they're going before they get there.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: eero Router behind Modem?


@krevbot wrote:

Obviously Hughes.net deploys with its own stock modem/router as default. I'm simply wondering that if I disable the router functionality, and plug an eero behind it, would it get me anything. 


You can use any 3rd party router you like with HughesNet, including the eero.  And, like you mentioned, you would want to disable the WiFi in the HT2000W, as you don't want the two WiFi sources interfering with each other.


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krevbot
New Poster

Re: eero Router behind Modem?

Yeah, that's what I was worried would be the conclusion.

 

In the back of my head I was hoping that somehow the way routers treated the latent traffic would mask it making it feel better or at least work better. Maybe if they held on to certain packets or something before sending them on.

 

Thanks for the reply!