cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

benefit of 3rd party router?

Highlighted
New Member

benefit of 3rd party router?

Can anyone tell me under what conditions a network would benefit from adding a 3rd party router such as the Netgear Nighthawk to the HT2000w? And if you did add it, how could you tell it was making a difference in connection stability or speed?

Thanks!

3 REPLIES 3
Highlighted
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: benefit of 3rd party router?

@dpschuste 

 

3rd party routers can often give better WiFi range than the built in WiFi of the HT2000W.  More settings options, as well.  

 

As for whether a 3rd party router would help, unless there is a range issue it's unlikely that it would make much of a difference.

 

With this said, HughesNet itself is under incredible strain right now due to being under a much higher system load than normal.  Because of this, and because of a prioritization policy that's in place to help work and schooling related activities, some things that may normally work well, like streaming and file downloads, may very well be more difficult.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
Highlighted
New Member

Re: benefit of 3rd party router?

GabeU, thanks for answering. Is a full broadcast icon a guarantee of full strength/range? or is it possible that a signal could be diminished/degraded and my wifi icon is still at full strength?

 

I have Hughes Business and our connection has been very unstable and slow. I hear you on the increased traffic, but I was also wondering if maybe having more devices drawing on the system (husband and kids using zoom and internet for work/online school; more devices connecting than usual) was too much for the HT2000w to handle and that maybe the signal was split too many ways/degraded, especially the further I got from the router.  That said, the wifi icon still shows full strength as far as possible from the router; AND I hooked up a Netgear Nighthawk x6s (8000) today (disabled the HT2000) and I think it made no difference--though I'm not sure how to measure that with any precision. If, as you say, range is the only benefit, then I guess it is no surprise that there was no noticeable improvement. Am just trying to give whatever signal I AM able to get from the satellite the best chance to stay at full strength once it's in the house and no matter how many people are using it.

Thanks for any other advice. If I don't hear otherwise from you, will probably unhook the Nighthawk and send it back. 

Highlighted
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: benefit of 3rd party router?

@dpschuste 

 

I'm not really familiar with how accurate the built in signal indicators in devices are.  Personally, I would check your WiFi signal strength using an actual application for that purpose.  The HughesNet Mobile App has a basic tester.  You can get it at the App Store or Google Play.  I'm not familiar with the Apple version, but for the Android version you can get to the signal tester by tapping the orange plus sign on the lower right and tapping the middle icon that pops up.   When you go to use the tester, you may get a message that says "We found some ways you can improve your Network performance.  Do you want to proceed?"  It does this for everyone, so just click no, otherwise it will give you phone number to call.  Annoying, for sure.  Smiley Tongue 

 

When you use this tester, you'll be testing the strength of the WiFi band the device is currently connected to.  So, if you're using a smart phone and that phone is connected via the 2.4GHz band, that's the band you'll be testing.  The same with the 5GHz band.  

 

But again, you can use whatever WiFi signal strength app you like.  I'd test in the different areas of your home that you use devices to see how well the signal is reaching those areas.  If you find an area that isn't getting at least a "GOOD" signal strength (preferably "EXCELLENT"), see if the Nighthawk is any better.  If it is, you may want to keep it and use it.  

 

For reference, the 2.4GHz band has better range than the 5GHz band, but the 5GHz band is less susceptible to interference.  Also, you may get better performance out of the 5GHz band, so if you have devices that can utilize the 5GHz band and they are within at least a "GOOD" signal footprint (preferably "EXCELLENT) for that band, you may want to use it over the 2.4GHz band for those devices. 

 

Lastly, service speed will be divided among devices actively using the service at the given time, though how it's divided will depend on the type of activity being performed on each of them.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro