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Mbps discussion

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Ryan11433
Junior

Mbps discussion


@Maui1957 wrote:

It will never disconnect you or charge you for going over your data limit, but you will experience reduced speeds of 1–3 Mbps once you hit your limit. That’s still enough speed to check email and use messaging apps, but expect buffering if you’re trying to stream the latest release from Netflix (or any other streaming platform).

1-3 Mps means Mega bits per second not mega bytes per second?? I have heard about this long time ago but what is the difference between bytes and bits?

 


 

16 REPLIES 16
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV


@Ryan11433 wrote:

1-3 Mps means Mega bits per second not mega bytes per second?? I have heard about this long time ago but what is the difference between bytes and bits?


Megabits per second is Mbps (Mb/s) and megabytes per second is MBps (MB/s).  8Mbps = 1MBps.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro


@GabeU wrote:

@Ryan11433 wrote:

1-3 Mps means Mega bits per second not mega bytes per second?? I have heard about this long time ago but what is the difference between bytes and bits?


Megabits per second is Mbps (Mb/s)


That is what I thought in the first place and thanks for the note.


@GabeU wrote:

@Ryan11433 wrote:

1-3 Mps means Mega bits per second not mega bytes per second?? I have heard about this long time ago but what is the difference between bytes and bits?


Mmegabytes per second is MBps (MB/s).  8Mbps = 1MBps.


Huh? Do you mean 8 instead of 1?

maratsade
Distinguished Professor IV

He means 1.

 

1 megabyte per second (MBps) equals 8 megabits per second (Mbps).

 


@Ryan11433 wrote:


Megabytes per second is MBps (MB/s).  8Mbps = 1MBps.


Huh? Do you mean 8 instead of 1?


 

 


@maratsade wrote:

He means 1.

 

1 megabyte per second (MBps) equals 8 megabits per second (Mbps).

 


@Ryan11433 wrote:


Megabytes per second is MBps (MB/s).  8Mbps = 1MBps.


Huh? Do you mean 8 instead of 1?


 

 


8 Mbps = 8,000 Kbps it is what Google also have said.

maratsade
Distinguished Professor IV

 

 

Yes, 8 megabits per second is 8,000 kilobits per second. 8 megabits per second is also 1 megabyte per second. 

 


@Ryan11433 wrote:


8 Mbps = 8,000 Kbps


 


@maratsade wrote:

 

 

Yes, 8 megabits per second is 8,000 kilobits per second. 8 megabits per second is also 1 megabyte per second. 

 


@Ryan11433 wrote:


8 Mbps = 8,000 Kbps


 


not exactly meaning and yeah it is below 8 megabytes but it is your meaning I just don't agree with it because I'm looking forward to maximum meaning.

GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV


@Ryan11433 wrote: 

not exactly meaning and yeah it is below 8 megabytes but it is your meaning I just don't agree with it because I'm looking forward to maximum meaning.


It's quite simple.  In the abbreviation, bytes is B and bits is b.  1 byte = 8 bits .  1MBps = 8Mbps, so 8Mbps = 1MBps, just as I said.  HughesNet and most other ISPs advertise their speed in bits per second, not bytes per second.  Most speed tests measure in bits per second (bps), but some also show bytes per second (Bps).

 

Now, we should probably allow this thread to continue with the OP's issue instead of filling it up with things unrelated.

 

Edit:  Discussion has since been separated from the original topic and put into its own in the General section.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
maratsade
Distinguished Professor IV

"It's quite simple."

 

You'd think, wouldn't you? LOL

A Byte is a character. Multiple bits make up a character.

Depending upon the number of control bits, there could be between 8-12 bits per Byte. I use 10 as a general rule, going back to the old signalling days when you had 8 data bits, 1 start bit, 1 stop bit and no parity bits.

 

Therefore, using simple conversion math:

 

                1,000,000 Byte        10 bits        10,000,000 bits
1MBps =  -------------------- * ---------------- = --------------------- = 10Mbps

                      sec                     1Byte                  sec

 


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV


@MarkJFine wrote:

A Byte is a character. Multiple bits make up a character.

Depending upon the number of control bits, there could be between 8-12 bits per Byte. I use 10 as a general rule, going back to the old signalling days when you had 8 data bits, 1 start bit, 1 stop bit and no parity bits.

 

Therefore, using simple conversion math:

 

                1,000,000 Byte        10 bits        10,000,000 bits
1MBps =  -------------------- * ---------------- = --------------------- = 10Mbps

                      sec                     1Byte                  sec

 


But nearly all commercial speed tests use binary, not decimal, for their conversions.  In speed tests 1MBps = 8Mbps and 1Mbps = 0.125MBps.  I've never seen speed tests using a decimal conversion before, or at least not in anything commercial.

 

And remember, this is data transfer rate, not data amounts like storage.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

@GabeU wrote:

And remember, this is data transfer rate, not data amounts like storage.


Helps to know how it's being transferred Smiley Happy



* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.

thanks for answering my question that you produced more detailed information. 

Mitcom1
New Poster

I would be happy with 1 meg I'm in the.2 and.3 no matter what. I'm learning that hughesnet was never meant to stream it was supposed to be for email only 

maratsade
Distinguished Professor IV

That's not accurate. You can do much more than email with HughesNet, including some streaming (though the latter varies depending on many factors).  

 

Mitcom1 wrote:

I would be happy with 1 meg I'm in the.2 and.3 no matter what. I'm learning that hughesnet was never meant to stream it was supposed to be for email only 


 

SleepyOwl
New Member

A bit (b) is a binary digit, either 0 or 1 A Byte (B) is a string of 8 bits.