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Frequently Asked Questions

Senior Instructor

Frequently Asked Questions

I realize we have a lot of 'macros' for answering things, and people tend to want to immediately post when the have a problem vs. search for a solution...

 

but have we thought of taking some of these macros and creating an organized, read-only FAQ section?


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
18 REPLIES
Associate Professor

Re: Frequently Asked Questions

Sounds like a good idea -- then we could direct people to specific answers on the FAQ. 

Senior Instructor

Re: Frequently Asked Questions

Plus, it might reduce the amount of posts and redundant responses if they see there's an explicit FAQ area.

 

The real trick is making it short, concise, and to the point, because a lot of people don't want to read a lot - especially if they're not happy.

 

One of the first ones should be a "where/how to post a problem" FAQ.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Associate Professor

Re: Frequently Asked Questions

Agreed.  I think it makes a lot of sense. 

Associate Professor

Re: Frequently Asked Questions

I have been meaning to make such a topic, however...  People don't seem to read them...  Most come from a google search to an already open topic it seems, and they just post there.

Senior Instructor

Re: Frequently Asked Questions

Easy fix is to load up the FAQ with the right keywords. That way it gains a better SEO score and comes up first.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Associate Professor
Senior Instructor

Re: Frequently Asked Questions

Thise might work, but I don't think they'd go over well. lol


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Associate Professor

Re: Frequently Asked Questions

Well, speaking only for myself, the benefit would be I could link to specific FAQ sections. I like this idea better than the macros.

Senior Instructor

Re: Frequently Asked Questions

spam-related stuff:
Q: My email was blocked as spam by Company X. What should I do?

Most internet providers with email service use one or more of the over 100 spam and "abuse" registries, of which HughesNet's email server IP(s) might be listed - not your personal IP address.

The only way to get off these lists is for an authorized HughesNet system administrator (or similar) to contact the list owners to find out why they are listed in order to fix the problem and get the email server in question de-listed.

Therefore:
1. Do not personally contact the provider directly as will just cause additional confusion or a frustrating non-response, since they have no means to get HughesNet de-listed.
2. Do not personally attempt to contact the list owners (even if you know which one HughesNet is listed on) since they typically won't deal with end-users, such as yourselves. They have no idea if you're really a spammer which defeats the purpose.
3. DO contact HughesNet, as they are the only ones that can do anything about it.

Just to get an appreciation for the immensity of this problem, a whole ton of people may have surreptitious malware and viruses on their computers and phones that are programmed to remotely send so-called "zombie" spams through an open relay upon command. Anyone using a HughesNet email server either by POP or IMAP client could be infected and not even know it.

Because of this, innocent email servers are getting flagged as spamhauses on these lists, just because one person may have visited a real sketchy website or opened an email they shouldn't have and (completely unbeknown to them) spewed a few of these so-called zombie spams through the system.

So as soon as another one of these rip loose through the email server and is detected by one or more of these lists, the list owners dump the email server IP back on the list again. You can only stop the cycle by a HughesNet sysad getting the offending email headers from the list owner to trace back to the original IP of the person who sent it and delicately "advise" them to scan their computers and/or phones.

Imagine the level of effort to track down the IPs of potentially thousands of these incidents (I suspect there might be even more than that system-wide), and you can quickly see how intense this can get.

As far as the spam problem goes, HughesNet people are aware and have a team working on it constantly. But I'm also pretty sure it takes a real long time to resolve, so some patience is necessary.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Q: How did they get my email address?

If you've ever:
1. Signed up for a mailing list subscription
2. Entered a sweepstakes
3. Posted your email address on a web site
4. Used your address to sign up for Facebook, Twitter or other social media
Chances are someone's either sold, stolen, or hacked your email address.

Spammers are constantly looking for valid names and email addresses in order to fool antispam software, as much as they're looking for valid open relays to send them through.

Some spammers have gone to great lengths to use malware in user applications in order to steal your address book. This way they can send you fake emails using the address of someone you may know in order to trick you into clicking on something malicious.

In some cases email servers have been known to be hacked and infected with a scheme to intercept email addresses, and return a flood of malicious spam back. Remember that the next time you send an email to someone and you suddenly start seeing a bunch of junk in your inbox within a few days. This is a good indication that their email server was hacked, and your address was compromised.

If you do get spam, make sure that all possible automation in your email client is turned off. This might include activating any external links, automatic downloading of external images, or opening of any attachments. Likewise, if you do get a suspicious email and happen to open it, never click on links, display external images, and never, ever open an attachment.

 

It's also tempting, but never, ever "unsubscribe" from a spam: They won't take you off the list and all you'll be doing is valiating yourself as a spam target.
--------------------------------------------------------------------
Q: How do I block spam?

It is impossible to block 100% of all spam and spammers are constantly changing their techniques to spoof anti-spam software.

The most commonly used, most effective spam detection system is Apache SpamAssassin, used by most internet providers and server hosts. It operates on analyzing the content of emails to look for signatures in the email headers and message body, and generates one or more flags based on these rules. The ranking of these flags is scored to determine if the email was spam or not.

The holistic approach is nice, but for all intents and purposes 99% of all spam will trigger any one or more of 11 flags. But as techniques and strategies are constantly changing, SpamAssassin constantly requires maintenance updates to keep it current otherwise it can become rather ineffective rather quickly.

The same is true for the junk filters in your email client. For example, Outlook is regularly updated almost monthly. By keeping your email client updated, it provides an additional two-phase approach that protects you when the email server accidentally lets one through.

Some clients allow you to block individual email addresses. Do not try to block individual email accounts unless you see the same one over and over. Trying to block someone named "samsclubsurvey@cleanaman.win" is fruitless, because the names and domains are constantly changing. Eventually you'll have overloaded the list of email addresses that your client can block, rendering it completely useless.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.