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Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?

Sophomore

Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?

Or do I need to be home?  Asking because I want to find out which devices are connected and how much data they are consuming.

 

Thanks.

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Distinguished Professor III

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?

@lorrie 

 

I think it's possible, but you're going to have to have remote access set up on your home computer, and you'd have to use something like VNC to do it (due to not having a static IP).  Then you'd have to remotely access the home computer to be able to access the modem's information pages.  It's convoluted, but I believe this is the only way it could work.  

 

If you're asking about a simple way to just remotely access the modem's information pages through the internet, then no, as the only way to access it is through a device directly connected to it, whether via an Ethernet cable or WiFi, hence the need to remotely access the computer directly connected to it.  

 

If someone else knows a way I'm sure they'll reply.  


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
12 REPLIES 12
Distinguished Professor III

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?

@lorrie 

 

I think it's possible, but you're going to have to have remote access set up on your home computer, and you'd have to use something like VNC to do it (due to not having a static IP).  Then you'd have to remotely access the home computer to be able to access the modem's information pages.  It's convoluted, but I believe this is the only way it could work.  

 

If you're asking about a simple way to just remotely access the modem's information pages through the internet, then no, as the only way to access it is through a device directly connected to it, whether via an Ethernet cable or WiFi, hence the need to remotely access the computer directly connected to it.  

 

If someone else knows a way I'm sure they'll reply.  


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Highlighted
Sophomore

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?

thank you.  I ask because I travel a lot for my job and need to make sure that when I come home to work from home, I still have data left (assuming the speed issues improve).  

Senior Instructor

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?

If all you need to do is check your usage status, you can check it on your account web page from anywhere.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Distinguished Professor III

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?


@MarkJFine wrote:

If all you need to do is check your usage status, you can check it on your account web page from anywhere.


While that's true for the overall data usage, it's not going to show her what's connected.  Still, even the modem pages aren't going to show her how much data each device is using.  Only a good 3rd party router with applicable software/firmware can do that.  Well, that and/or some type of data monitoring software, like Glasswire, installed on each device.    


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Senior Instructor

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?


@GabeU wrote:


While that's true for the overall data usage, it's not going to show her what's connected...


Right, but she's looking for something to look at when not at home, and just to see if there's data left.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
Distinguished Professor III

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?


@MarkJFine wrote:

@GabeU wrote:


While that's true for the overall data usage, it's not going to show her what's connected...


Right, but she's looking for something to look at when not at home, and just to see if there's data left.


That's not what I got from her opening post, but yes, she'll be able to do that.  

 

What I got was that, while away, she wants to be able to see what is connected, or was connected, and how much data each of those things used.  And to make sure that she still has some data when she gets home, which she'll be able to see from going online. 

 

Edit:  And I completely missed her reply to my post that alluded to what you stated. 


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Professor

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?

I got the same impression from this: "I want to find out which devices are connected and how much data they are consuming."  

 

Could something like LogMeIn work here?

 


@GabeU wrote:

What I got was that, while away, she wants to be able to see what is connected, or was connected, and how much data each of those things used.  


 

Distinguished Professor III

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?


@maratsade wrote: 

Could something like LogMeIn work here?



@MarkJFine 

 

I wonder how hard it would be to create some on demand type thing where one could sign into something like the My Account site and have it access the modem's information pages.  We know that it's possible, as the reps have the ability to remote access our modem info, but I wonder how difficult it would be to make something like that available for the subscriber.  

 

Granted, I don't know that it would be used much, but it definitely could come in handy in cases like the OP's.  

 

Or, maybe even have it take an hourly snapshot that's uploaded to the site for later viewing.  It would use a little data, for sure, but maybe not so much that it couldn't just be included in any overhead that's not counted in the first place.  

 

Then again, I guess the end question is, would it be worth it?  The OPs question is actually the first I've ever seen of this type, so maybe it wouldn't be used by enough people for them to even bother with it.  

 

I'm just thinking out loud.  Perhaps I shouldn't do that.  Smiley Tongue  


AMD FX-6100 | Samsung 250GB 840 EVO SSD | Western Digital Blue 500GB HDD | 16GB DDR3-1866 | EVGA Geforce GTX 550ti | Windows 10 Pro 64-bit
Senior Instructor

Re: Can I log in to my modem from a remote location?

I would think between the page I stated and the old by-hour thing (if it still exists) would work fine for what's needed.

Right now the modem doesn't show historic usage by device, but does show what's currently connected. Not sure how helpful that is because whatever was using data could have already disconnected and there's no way to discern the two... yet.

 

Technically, we know it's possible to make this available remotely 'somewhere'. The question we're not asking is 'should we'.

 

When it comes to things like this sometimes it's better to keep data that might be available out in the open to a minimum for security purposes. You certainly don't want someone being able to log directly into your modem to update it with something cURLed via remote code from a DigitalOcean, Alibaba, or Baidu botnet server so it becomes part of someone's Bitcoin mining operation (as an example).

 

I see logs of these kinds of things meant for IoT devices on a daily basis. They are indiscriminate and attack things incrementally sweeping through IPs with no DNS involved, looking for targets, using php vulnerability probing scripts that are as long as my arm. And, they're getting sneaky enough to use open proxies to hide behind so all you know is the signature of the attack, but no proof of the source.

 

Realize that sounds pretty grim, almost tin-hatted, but it's reality. I just spent two hours just dealing with the shenanigans my one site got hit with today.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.