cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Google Chrome "turbo" feature?

Highlighted
New Poster

Google Chrome "turbo" feature?

I stumbled onto some comments about using a "turbo" feature with Google Chrome in order to save on data usage, but am not able to find it now.  Is there such a thing?  I currently use Safari, but would be willing to convert to Chrome if it can save me data.  I'm on OS10.12.6.  Any feedback is appreciated.

2 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS

Accepted Solutions
Associate Professor

Re: Google Chrome "turbo" feature?

I wouldn't recomend use of the Chrome Data Saver feature in the browser, for a few reasons.

The way it works in chrome is that you start using a proxy server. Your browser sends to the proxy that it wants a website, the proxy then grabs that website, loads it all into a bundle and compresses it, then sends it to your Chrome browser.  Much like how Web Acceleration with Hughesnet works.

However, that system fails if you are requesting an HTTPS website, and will load "normally".  Most websites now, use a secure connection method.

To top it off, you may actually use MORE data when visiting non-secure websites if you use both Web Acceleration on Hughesnet and the Chrome Data Saver feature.

The feature in Chrome is the same as Web Acceleration up to a point
You can't compress what is already compressed
Going through multiple proxies means there's extra data being sent and recieved, as all proxies must know where information is going to, and coming from, so it can be forwarded.
HTTPS doesn't work with compression technologies - most websites are now HTTPS.


If you are wanting to save data, I suggest using an adblocker, as well as something that will stop autoplaying videos from playing or loading.  I am not aware of how Safari works (latest versions seem to be Mac only??), so you may have to look at Apple specific websites for more information on how to do this.

Senior Instructor

Re: Google Chrome "turbo" feature?

Short answer is: maybe.

 

Browsers are starting to come out with things like this, usually combined with a proxy/pseudo-VPN feature. Opera is one of these, and I've seen some people use something similar for Chrome in web logs.

 

Just a guess, but what these things typically do is pre-load the parts of a web page you're trying to view and do a bunch of optimization things: set browser cache expirations, minimize css and js code, ensure images are compressed, etc.

 

In theory it would save a little bit of data, however, it also adds an extra layer of processing on top of what Hughes' web acceleration schemes are doing. How that works together might have varying results.

 

Not sure the end result would give you any noticeable speed increase or data savings. On top of that you'd be adding another player in the loop that's monitoring your browsing habits...  so there's a security aspect as well.

 

Disclaimer: I really hate those things from a web admin perspective, because I see a ton of anonymous malicious bots running behind Amazon AWS, OVH France, and a bunch of random Opera and Chrome VPN "users" in Nigeria (et. al.). All of these use such proxies for nefarious purposes and I seriously dislike giving random X-Forwarded IPs the "403" treatment when they're dynamically assigned.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
2 REPLIES 2
Associate Professor

Re: Google Chrome "turbo" feature?

I wouldn't recomend use of the Chrome Data Saver feature in the browser, for a few reasons.

The way it works in chrome is that you start using a proxy server. Your browser sends to the proxy that it wants a website, the proxy then grabs that website, loads it all into a bundle and compresses it, then sends it to your Chrome browser.  Much like how Web Acceleration with Hughesnet works.

However, that system fails if you are requesting an HTTPS website, and will load "normally".  Most websites now, use a secure connection method.

To top it off, you may actually use MORE data when visiting non-secure websites if you use both Web Acceleration on Hughesnet and the Chrome Data Saver feature.

The feature in Chrome is the same as Web Acceleration up to a point
You can't compress what is already compressed
Going through multiple proxies means there's extra data being sent and recieved, as all proxies must know where information is going to, and coming from, so it can be forwarded.
HTTPS doesn't work with compression technologies - most websites are now HTTPS.


If you are wanting to save data, I suggest using an adblocker, as well as something that will stop autoplaying videos from playing or loading.  I am not aware of how Safari works (latest versions seem to be Mac only??), so you may have to look at Apple specific websites for more information on how to do this.

Senior Instructor

Re: Google Chrome "turbo" feature?

Short answer is: maybe.

 

Browsers are starting to come out with things like this, usually combined with a proxy/pseudo-VPN feature. Opera is one of these, and I've seen some people use something similar for Chrome in web logs.

 

Just a guess, but what these things typically do is pre-load the parts of a web page you're trying to view and do a bunch of optimization things: set browser cache expirations, minimize css and js code, ensure images are compressed, etc.

 

In theory it would save a little bit of data, however, it also adds an extra layer of processing on top of what Hughes' web acceleration schemes are doing. How that works together might have varying results.

 

Not sure the end result would give you any noticeable speed increase or data savings. On top of that you'd be adding another player in the loop that's monitoring your browsing habits...  so there's a security aspect as well.

 

Disclaimer: I really hate those things from a web admin perspective, because I see a ton of anonymous malicious bots running behind Amazon AWS, OVH France, and a bunch of random Opera and Chrome VPN "users" in Nigeria (et. al.). All of these use such proxies for nefarious purposes and I seriously dislike giving random X-Forwarded IPs the "403" treatment when they're dynamically assigned.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.