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To turn off, or not to turn off?

To turn off, or not to turn off?

  Some of you have mentioned that you turn off your computer and/or modem every day. I never turn anything off, except in the very rare cases where Linux locks up. I started doing this back when the Intel 386 came out, and I had read that these new Intel chips ran so hot, that you're better off leaving them on, so as to not subject them to the mechanical stresses of cooling down and then heating back up again. I also remember from my industrial electrician days, that the most stress on a system occurs during start up. So I leave everything on. I've Googled around on this subject and most of the stuff I've read was rather wishy washy.

 

  Any thoughts?

6 REPLIES 6
MarkJFine
Associate Professor

Re: To turn off, or not to turn off?

Used to be that you would leave things on because the collective effects of transient surges from turning them off and on repeatedly would be detrimental. Not sure that's so these days since the protection is a bit better, especially things with internal batteries.

 

I turn off what I can at night, but leave things on during the day just for a time savings thing, if anything.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: To turn off, or not to turn off?

Though I have no idea if unplugging the modem on a nightly basis has any effect on its life span, I can say that I've not had any issues with doing so.  I've only had my current modem (HT2000W) since March 2017, and the HT1100 prior to that for an even shorter amount of time (~ 14 months), but the HN7000S I had prior to that was one that I had for around eight years or so.  No problems with any of them, including the two models I had in the three years prior to that.  They were coming out with new modems to upgrade to quite often back then, and they would constantly pester you to do so.  I had three different modems in as many years.  Smiley Tongue  

 

And, though I don't know how much doing the same can affect the radio on this dish, I've not had any issues with them, either.  

 

This is only my experience, of course.  YMMV.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

Re: To turn off, or not to turn off?

  Thanks for your reply.  I forgot to mention that I have a ethernet switch between my computer and the modem which allows me to isolate the modem when I'm not online.  This makes it very easy to see if data is being used through my wifi.

 

  I too haven't had any issues with leaving everything on.  Plus I don't have to wait for things to boot up when I get back on the internet at 3:00 AM every morning.  :<)>

Re: To turn off, or not to turn off?


@MarkJFine wrote:

I turn off what I can at night, but leave things on during the day just for a time savings thing, if anything.


  Thanks for your reply. I think It may have made a difference 35 years ago, it's probably a wash now, as far as equipment life.  I'm just lazy, so I leave everything on.

MarkJFine
Associate Professor

Re: To turn off, or not to turn off?

Transients were **bleep** on CRT monitors. Burn-in problems on early CRTs were even worse. I remember I would go through monitors about every other year, and usually right in the middle of the final stage of a software release: while writing the docs and help files. Not fun.

 

Of course, newer flat screens have different issues, but transients aren't one of them.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.

Re: To turn off, or not to turn off?


@MarkJFine wrote:

Transients were **bleep** on CRT monitors. Burn-in problems on early CRTs were even worse. I remember I would go through monitors about every other year, and usually right in the middle of the final stage of a software release: while writing the docs and help files. Not fun.

 

Of course, newer flat screens have different issues, but transients aren't one of them.


  At first, all of our operator consoles were 27" CRTs that weighed a ton, and they were always located at the top of least two flights of stairs  Even though they were powered from an always on the inverter UPS, and they were almost never turned off, they failed quite often.  Everybody in the department breathed a sigh of relief when the much lighter flat screens came out.