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Kcapps
Freshman

Modem

I don’t have enough ports on the back of my HughesNet HT2000W modem for all my devices what can I do?
6 ACCEPTED SOLUTIONS
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV


@Kcapps wrote:
I don’t have enough ports on the back of my HughesNet HT2000W modem for all my devices what can I do?

You can add an ethernet "switch" to one of the LAN ports to create more LAN ports.  

 

Edit:  There are too many articles on this to link to just one, so if you need to learn about this I suggest a Google search of something like "How do I add LAN ports to a router?".  The articles will give you an idea of what you need to do, but it's fairly simple.    


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

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Thx so much Gabe I appreciate it, great information! I googled it like you said and I’m headed to Office Depot in the AM. 👍

View solution in original post

GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

You're welcome.  One thing I should have added, just in case, is that you can also connect a 3rd party router to the HT2000W modem if you have one that you previously used.  Granted, most routers only have four LAN ports, like the modem itself, but it would give you a total of seven available ports.  So, if you already have a router that you previously used, you should be able to use that instead of needing to buy anything extra.  That is, unless you need more LAN ports that the four extra a 3rd party router would provide. 

 

Also, when I use the term "router", I'm referring to the WiFi routers that people buy when they want to use their devices via WiFi and their ISP doesn't provide WiFi (like the HT2000W does). 

 

And, just in case, I want to tag a few people just to make sure the info I've given you is correct about the HT2000W and adding the switch.  I'm reasonably sure it is, but I other people know more about the HT2000W than I, and I'd hate for you to buy a switch only to find out I was wrong.  @MarkJFine @BirdDog @Gwalk900  


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

View solution in original post

GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

Mark,

 

Definitely.  I should have mentioned that multiple devices using the service at the same time will divide the speed, and not necessarily evenly, and, of course, the more devices actively using the service at the same time the slower each will be, and again, not necessarily being divided evenly.  

 

With that said, though, I just wanted to make sure that my info about adding the switch was correct.  I know that with regular routers it is, and I'm pretty sure it's the same with the HT2000W, as it's a router, too, but I tagged you guys as I just wanted to make sure.  I know you guys know more about networking than I do.    


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

View solution in original post

GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

@Kcapps

 

I did just verify with someone that yes, for sure, a Switch is definitely what you want for adding LAN ports to the HT2000W.  I just wanted to be sure as I don't have as much networking knowledge as I would like, and though I was reasonably sure, again, I didn't want you to end up having bought one only to find out that I was wrong. That would have been bad, for sure.  😛 

 

The person recommended an eight port Switch, as that will give you lots of ports, but you can use whatever you like.  With an eight port Switch that would give you a total of ten ports (as one on the modem and one on the switch would be tied up being connected to each other).  Three on the modem and seven on the Switch to utilize. 

 

Happy browsing!     


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

View solution in original post

BirdDog
Assistant Professor


@Gwalk900 wrote:

My choice would be to dissable the HT2000 wireless radios, disconnect all wired devices and add an Asus RT-AC88

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833320242&ignorebbr=1&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleAdwords...

 

8 ports and the Traffic Analyzer function.

 


And as has already been mentioned, you could have 16 ports with all having devices connected but the speed (bandwidth) of your HughesNet max speed will be devided up among all those in use at the same time. That could result in drastic speed reduction per device in use, especially if not getting "up to" speed to beging with.

 

Everything has a price. More ports, more devices connected, more in use at the same time equals slower speed for each device. Especially true if 3, 4, 5........devices doing constant data intensive things like streaming video.

View solution in original post

12 REPLIES 12
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV


@Kcapps wrote:
I don’t have enough ports on the back of my HughesNet HT2000W modem for all my devices what can I do?

You can add an ethernet "switch" to one of the LAN ports to create more LAN ports.  

 

Edit:  There are too many articles on this to link to just one, so if you need to learn about this I suggest a Google search of something like "How do I add LAN ports to a router?".  The articles will give you an idea of what you need to do, but it's fairly simple.    


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

Thx so much Gabe I appreciate it, great information! I googled it like you said and I’m headed to Office Depot in the AM. 👍
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

You're welcome.  One thing I should have added, just in case, is that you can also connect a 3rd party router to the HT2000W modem if you have one that you previously used.  Granted, most routers only have four LAN ports, like the modem itself, but it would give you a total of seven available ports.  So, if you already have a router that you previously used, you should be able to use that instead of needing to buy anything extra.  That is, unless you need more LAN ports that the four extra a 3rd party router would provide. 

 

Also, when I use the term "router", I'm referring to the WiFi routers that people buy when they want to use their devices via WiFi and their ISP doesn't provide WiFi (like the HT2000W does). 

 

And, just in case, I want to tag a few people just to make sure the info I've given you is correct about the HT2000W and adding the switch.  I'm reasonably sure it is, but I other people know more about the HT2000W than I, and I'd hate for you to buy a switch only to find out I was wrong.  @MarkJFine @BirdDog @Gwalk900  


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

The only thing that concerns me here is that we're talking about using more than 4 wired devices, potentially at the same time, in addition to an unknown number of wireless devices.

Although wired will give you the best throughput through the router, know that more devices always means potentially less throughput and a higher probability of having speed issues at each device.

Just throwing it out there.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

Mark,

 

Definitely.  I should have mentioned that multiple devices using the service at the same time will divide the speed, and not necessarily evenly, and, of course, the more devices actively using the service at the same time the slower each will be, and again, not necessarily being divided evenly.  

 

With that said, though, I just wanted to make sure that my info about adding the switch was correct.  I know that with regular routers it is, and I'm pretty sure it's the same with the HT2000W, as it's a router, too, but I tagged you guys as I just wanted to make sure.  I know you guys know more about networking than I do.    


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro

Works like a charm I ended up getting a tp link switch with 5 ports works fantastic with the HT2000W very happy 😃 everything seems at normal speed so no worries whatsoever fellas. Thanks everyone for your help!!
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

@Kcapps

 

Glad it worked.  🙂 

 

Happy Thanksgiving!  


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

@Kcapps

 

I did just verify with someone that yes, for sure, a Switch is definitely what you want for adding LAN ports to the HT2000W.  I just wanted to be sure as I don't have as much networking knowledge as I would like, and though I was reasonably sure, again, I didn't want you to end up having bought one only to find out that I was wrong. That would have been bad, for sure.  😛 

 

The person recommended an eight port Switch, as that will give you lots of ports, but you can use whatever you like.  With an eight port Switch that would give you a total of ten ports (as one on the modem and one on the switch would be tied up being connected to each other).  Three on the modem and seven on the Switch to utilize. 

 

Happy browsing!     


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
Gwalk900
Honorary Alumnus

My choice would be to dissable the HT2000 wireless radios, disconnect all wired devices and add an Asus RT-AC88

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833320242&ignorebbr=1&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleAdwords...

 

8 ports and the Traffic Analyzer function.

 

BirdDog
Assistant Professor


@Gwalk900 wrote:

My choice would be to dissable the HT2000 wireless radios, disconnect all wired devices and add an Asus RT-AC88

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833320242&ignorebbr=1&nm_mc=KNC-GoogleAdwords...

 

8 ports and the Traffic Analyzer function.

 


And as has already been mentioned, you could have 16 ports with all having devices connected but the speed (bandwidth) of your HughesNet max speed will be devided up among all those in use at the same time. That could result in drastic speed reduction per device in use, especially if not getting "up to" speed to beging with.

 

Everything has a price. More ports, more devices connected, more in use at the same time equals slower speed for each device. Especially true if 3, 4, 5........devices doing constant data intensive things like streaming video.

Not to mention who knows what to the processing at the gateways.


* Disclaimer: I am a HughesNet customer and not a HughesNet employee. All of my comments are my own and do not necessarily represent HughesNet in any way.
BirdDog
Assistant Professor


@MarkJFine wrote:

Not to mention who knows what to the processing at the gateways.


Lots of collisions I would think. I honestly don't know how well the system handles multiple requests from the same client modem at the same time even though it is duplex.