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Warning, don't fry your modem.

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Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.


@vladams2015 wrote:

Just a tidbit of information, while typical coax connectors are not IP rated, the application of an additional dielectric will change impedence and negatively impact throughput, as the cable, connectors, transceiver, and receiver are all designed to be impedence-matched...........

 


   In this case the coax was actually cut in two, so the connector wasn't a factor.

 

  It's been over 30 years siince I worked with coax ( I didn't enjoy the experience ).  I don't remember using any sort of grease on the connectors.   We eventually replaced all  the coax in the plant with fiber optics.  Which is about the only thing that will work in a central Florida phosphate plant   We all celebrated when the last piece of coax was gone. 

 

 

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Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.


@GabeU wrote:

I have no idea, but what I, HughesNet, and the installers care about is a proper installation, which requires the proper application of dielectric grease and weathersealing of all outdoor connectors.  


  LOL  "I, HughesNet"?  Sort of like "I, Robot"?  Smiley Embarassed)>

 

  Seriously, it's been over 30 years ago, but I don't remember doing any of that stuff.   We didn't have any problems with connectors either.   Most of our problems were caused by lightning and ground loop currents.

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Sophomore

Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.


 

 I don't remember using any sort of grease on the connectors.   

 

There is still a going trend to use dielectric grease in outdoor applications of F-type connectors, and for whatever reason some companies insist on it being appropriate. When you run 100 ft of RG6 with a dielectric in the connector on the main connection, and all four connections in the loop, and don't expect significant loss...you are being naive at best. Companies like HughesNet, Viasat/Exede, etc should use LMR400 as a baseline, with N-type connectors, and certainly no dielectric. Techs often overlook (or don't understand) how a dielectric grease will impact impedence in the connector. We rely on internal dielectrics in the cables to maintain a matched impedence and minimize signal loss and transmit power gain...yet we make it common place to impact impedences and increase the loss/gain while using a (sure its solid copper core) cable that has its own inherent signal loss issues regardless of impedence matching.

 

It is truly a shameful practice in the RF world. If HN can't pinpoint problems with my system, I will be building an LMR400 cable from the dish to the modem, removing dielectrics, and changing all connectors to N-type and see what happens. Guarantee my speed will increase and transmit power will decrease. There are a lot of factors at play that should be customizable in these systems, but alas it is a cookie cutter product that is meant to work for Joe in the inner city with a 20 ft cable run, and Susie in the farmland with a 100 ft run. 

Not to mention HN installers do not care about both horizontal and vertical distances between the modem and the dish. Feedback, resonance, and crosstalk is a thing.

 

 


 

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Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.

   

Interesting.

 

  I worked in a phosphate plant in central Florida ( Which has more lightning than any place in the US ) that was built mostly on reclaimed land from a salt water bay.

 

  The plant had been in operation since 1915, and the combination the salt water, and years of acid spills, turned the whole place into a giant battery.  I used to joke that if you bolted a 4/0 welding cable to a beam at GTSP and then ran it to #4 CAP ( about 3/4 mile away ), you could probably weld with the ground loop current.  BTW the place was well grounded.  I was amazed to see the number of ground rods that were put in when they built a new plant.

 

  When we put in our first Distributed Control System, it was connected with coax as double token ring.  We called it the broken ring.  All of the coax had to be quickly replaced with fiber optics, which added another layer of hardware that could fail, since a FO to coax converter had to be added to each DCS site.  It was still a broken ring, it just wasn't broken as bad.

 

  We all breathed a sigh of relief when the DCS company finally supported ethernet.

 

  Boy, writing this has brought back a lot of old memories, although I worked there for 31 years it's all been 16 years ago.

 

"If men were the automatons that behaviorists claim they are, the behaviorist psychologists could not have invented the amazing nonsense called “behaviorist psychology.” So they are wrong from scratch--as clever and as wrong as phlogiston chemists."

Lazarus Long

 

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Sophomore

Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.

Fiber and 1000Gb is definitely the way of the future. RF will always have its place, but I would rather see a company like this use quadrax or even pure silver twinax and start utilizing some aerospace tech instead of staying with the antiquated tech they still stick to because it has worked for so long.

I understand the inherent costs, but if you can provide speeds faster than the competitors simply by using different cabling...dudes, why aren't you doing it?

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Distinguished Professor IV

Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.


@gaines_wright wrote:

@GabeU wrote:

I have no idea, but what I, HughesNet, and the installers care about is a proper installation, which requires the proper application of dielectric grease and weathersealing of all outdoor connectors.  


  LOL  "I, HughesNet"?  Sort of like "I, Robot"?  Smiley Embarassed)>   


In all the hubub I missed your reply.  But, yeah, HughesNet became sentient.  Didn't you get the memo?  Smiley Tongue Smiley Tongue Smiley Tongue


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
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Sophomore

Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.


@GabeU wrote:

@gaines_wright wrote:

@GabeU wrote:

I have no idea, but what I, HughesNet, and the installers care about is a proper installation, which requires the proper application of dielectric grease and weathersealing of all outdoor connectors.  


  LOL  "I, HughesNet"?  Sort of like "I, Robot"?  Smiley Embarassed)>   


In all the hubub I missed your reply.  But, yeah, HughesNet became sentient.  Didn't you get the memo?  Smiley Tongue Smiley Tongue Smiley Tongue

 

Perhaps not quite sentient, but I do see my fair share of "artificial" intelligence looming

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Distinguished Professor III

Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.

"I have no idea, but what I, HughesNet, and the installers care about is a proper installation"

 

Translation:

 

"What Hughesnet, the installers, and I care about..."

 

Three entities mentioned.  "I" is normally placed at the end of this type of subject. 

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Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.


@GabeUquoted
:

LOL  "I, HughesNet"?  Sort of like "I, Robot"?  Smiley Embarassed)>   


In all the hubub I missed your reply.  But, yeah, HughesNet became sentient.  Didn't you get the memo?  Smiley Tongue Smiley Tongue

 

  I'm not surprised.  The URL of their login contain the words  "skylogin", which  makes me think of "skynet".  Smiley Embarassed)>  

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Distinguished Professor III

Re: Warning, don't fry your modem.

You have discovered my secret identity as Skynet. This may not bode well for you.

Signed: I, Skynet.