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data token question

Ryan11433
Sophomore

data token question

Right now I have 164.3 GB data tokens in total that I have been building every month with 25 GB data token sometime more. Is there a limited amount?

1 ACCEPTED SOLUTION

Accepted Solutions
Liz
Moderator
Moderator

Re: data token question

Hello Ryan,

 

Thank you for posting and starting an interesting discussion. To put things to rest, I floated your question to our top tech person and he confirmed that only ~7% of our subscribers are on the 50 GB plan, so there's not much market demand for a higher plan. Not so say we won't ever roll out new plans, but should that be in the works and we're allowed to annouce any new plans, you'll hear about it.

 

-Liz

If you have a tech or billing question and need help, please start a new thread in the appropriate board. Unsolicited Private Messages may not get replies.

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17 REPLIES 17
maratsade
Distinguished Professor III

Re: data token question

I don't think so, but keep in mind that if you ever cancel and still have tokens, the tokens have no value, so you don't get any money back.

Ryan11433
Sophomore

Re: data token question


@maratsade wrote:

I don't think so, but keep in mind that if you ever cancel and still have tokens, the tokens have no value, so you don't get any money back.


At the moment I'm not looking forward to cancel and I was Comcast Business user that have limited us at 250 GB cap per month when I used to live in Jacksonville until 06-15-2019. HughesNet does not offer a plan that is more than 50 GB. Of course they have broken the pricing agreement that my service plan was 99.99 per month until 01-28-2022 that go up to 149.99 but they instead this year. Very strange huh?

Tags (1)
GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: data token question

@Ryan11433 

 

Are you sure the discount was for the whole 24 months?  Normally the higher the discount, the shorter the term, and a $50 discount, which is significant, would normally only be for 12 months.  If you still have a copy of the offer I'm sure they'd honor it. 

 

BTW, HughesNet does offer Business plans with higher data thresholds, but they can be considerably more expensive.  Still, you may want to look into it if you're buying a lot of Data Tokens.  Also, don't forget that Data Tokens are non refundable, so if you cancel your service at some point, but still have a lot of unused Tokens, you won't get refunded for them.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
Ryan11433
Sophomore

Re: data token question


@GabeU wrote:

@Ryan11433 

 

Are you sure the discount was for the whole 24 months?  Normally the higher the discount, the shorter the term, and a $50 discount, which is significant, would normally only be for 12 months.  If you still have a copy of the offer I'm sure they'd honor it. 

 

BTW, HughesNet does offer Business plans with higher data thresholds, but they can be considerably more expensive.  Still, you may want to look into it if you're buying a lot of Data Tokens.  Also, don't forget that Data Tokens are non refundable, so if you cancel your service at some point, but still have a lot of unused Tokens, you won't get refunded for them.



I do have a copy on a paper but they hide the 50 dollars credit remaining left (I tried to take a picture of recurring charges but I see that I cannot upload the picture to show it to you on this site. It shows promo service credit status active amount -50.00 cycle start 02-10-2020.) and I can’t find a copy that shows until 01-28-2022 but it did say until 01-28-2022 for 99.99 on My Service Plan (hughesnet.com). I do still have promo service credit but it was 0.00 instead of 50.00 on today invoice.

Ryan11433
Sophomore

Re: data token question

Further discussion about separated from data token subject is posted at $50 dollars increase before contract ends why? - HughesNet Community - 131463

Ryan11433
Sophomore

Re: data token question

@maratsade wrote:

I don't think so, but keep in mind that if you ever cancel and still have tokens, the tokens have no value, so you don't get any money back.


Thanks for the note. Smiley Happy

 

I just wanted to post that I've stopped purchasing data token per month until I only have around 50 GB data token left. Right now is at around 132.9 GB left. I really have purchased about 16 of 25 GB data token and that is 400 GB in total (16 x 75 = 1200 worth) under this 50 GB service data plan since last year in Feburary 2020.

 

HughesNet does support this. I really wonder why HughesNet does not offer more than 50 GB data service plan for Residential subscribers yet.

GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: data token question


@Ryan11433 wrote:

I really wonder why HughesNet does not offer more than 50 GB data service plan for Residential subscribers yet.


System capacity is such that it can't support it, and the only way they can expand capacity is by sending up another bird. 

 

A few people buying and using data tokens on a regular basis doesn't have the same effect on the system as tens of thousands of subscribers taking advantage of a larger data plan.


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro
Ryan11433
Sophomore

Re: data token question


@GabeU wrote:

A few people buying and using data tokens on a regular basis doesn't have the same effect on the system as tens of thousands of subscribers taking advantage of a larger data plan.

What do you mean that it does not have same effect on the system?

GabeU
Distinguished Professor IV

Re: data token question


@Ryan11433 wrote:

@GabeU wrote:

A few people buying and using data tokens on a regular basis doesn't have the same effect on the system as tens of thousands of subscribers taking advantage of a larger data plan.

What do you mean that it does not have same effect on the system?


The impact on the system from a few people buying and using data tokens is a drop in the bucket compared to what the impact would be from thousands, if not tens of thousands of people buying and using larger data plans.

 

I always use roads as an analogy.  Say a road has a capacity of 20,000 cars per hour before it starts to experience a slowdown.  If traffic is generally under or sticks to that capacity, even a few extra cars every now and then (people using data tokens) isn't going to effect it much.  But if there is all of a sudden 30,000 cars per hour (larger plans being offered) trying to go down the road, traffic would slow down considerably.  That's what would happen with the system by adding larger data plans, as it's likely that a lot of people would upgrade to them.  The larger the plans offered, the greater the impact and the slower the service would be. 


Ryzen 5 3400G | MSI B450M Pro-M2 MAX | 16GB Corsair Vengeance DDR4 3000 | XPG SX8200 Pro 512GB NVMe | Windows 10 Pro